Housing Lottery Launches for 43-17 & 43-19 108th Street in Corona, Queens

43-17 & 43-19 108th Street in Corona, Queens via NYC Housing Connect

The affordable housing lottery has launched for 43-17 and 43-19 108th Street, a pair of four-story residential buildings in Corona, Queens. Designed by Chang Hwa Tan of Tan Architect and developed by Hsiu-Hsiung Lin, the structures each yield seven residences. Available on NYC Housing Connect are six units for residents at 130 percent of the area median income (AMI), ranging in eligible income from $69,429 to $156,130.

43-17 & 43-19 108th Street in Corona, Queens via NYC Housing Connect

43-17 & 43-19 108th Street in Corona, Queens via NYC Housing Connect

Amenities include bike storage lockers, a shared laundry room, storage, and a virtual doorman. Residences come equipped with dishwashers, air conditioning, hardwood floors, high-speed internet, and name-brand kitchen appliances, countertops, and finishes. Tenants are responsible for electricity including heat and gas including stove and hot water.

At 130 percent of the AMI, there are six one-bedrooms with a monthly rent of $2,025 for incomes ranging from $69,429 to $156,130.

43-17 & 43-19 108th Street in Corona, Queens via NYC Housing Connect

43-17 & 43-19 108th Street in Corona, Queens via NYC Housing Connect

Prospective renters must meet income and household size requirements to apply for these apartments. Applications must be postmarked or submitted online no later than December 14, 2022.

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5 Comments on "Housing Lottery Launches for 43-17 & 43-19 108th Street in Corona, Queens"

  1. What a looker…

  2. Why does affordable housing have to be so horrid? This is depressing. The architect should sue his grad school for malpractice.

    • Bad architects with no imagination. Seems counterintuitive like a violinist that can’t play anything pleasing to the ear, but they are everywhere.

    • It doesn’t have to be but the budgets are typically smaller. There are good architects with enough experience to know how to leverage the money available in a way that produces high quality buildings.

  3. The old house on the corner with the storefront facing the tracks was pretty beat up but had loads of character. This has neither looks or character and the setback from 44th is nonsensical…and while were on the subject how are these ground floor units like that even allowed? Who would want to live in those?

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