Stone Façades Near Completion on Beckford House and Tower, on Manhattan’s Upper East Side

Beckford House and Beckford Tower. Photo by Michael Young

Two residential buildings on Manhattan’s Upper East Side are steadily progressing toward completion. Beckford House, located at 301 East 81st Street, also addressed as 1562 Second Avenue, and Beckford Tower at 301 East 80th Street are both topped out and installation of their brick and stone façades is nearly finished. Located in the neighborhood of Yorkville, the projects are designed by Studio Sofield and SLCE Architects and developed by Icon Realty ManagementCM & Associates is in charge of construction management.

Beckford House and Beckford Tower. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford House, the shorter component, stands 215 feet high and 19 stories tall. This building will contain retail space on the cellar and ground-floor levels, and 32 condominiums that range from two- to five-bedrooms homes. There are three units per floor from the second level to the fifth, two per floor from the sixth to 12th story, full-floor homes from the 13th to 17th story, and a duplex penthouse on the 18th and 19th stories. Amenities begin on the second level and include a swimming pool, a basketball court, a fitness and yoga center, several communal lounges, a children’s playroom, a shared roof deck, a laundry room, a bike storage room, a mail and package room, and additional residential storage.

Beckford House. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford House. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford House. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford House. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford House. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford House. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford House. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford House. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford Tower, the taller of the two properties, rises 29 stories high and will yield 72 units that range from one- to six-bedroom residences. Five units are housed on each floor from the second through sixth floors, and the rest of the structure will have three or fewer on each level. Amenities for Beckford Tower include an indoor swimming pool, a sports court, a fitness center and yoga studio, a party room, a game room, a children’s playroom, a laundry room, a bicycle storage room, residential storage, a mail and package room, and concierge service.

Beckford Tower. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford Tower. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford Tower. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford Tower. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford Tower. Photo by Michael Young

Beckford Tower. Photo by Michael Young

The projected sellout for Beckford House is $185 million and $528 million for its taller sibling. Prices will range from $2 million for one-bedroom residences to more than $20 million for penthouse units.

Beckford House and Tower should be completed sometime next year.

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6 Comments on "Stone Façades Near Completion on Beckford House and Tower, on Manhattan’s Upper East Side"

  1. Wow. Look like they could have been there since the turn of the century (1900’s).

  2. Beautiful facades and presence on the skyline. If the interiors are as masterfully designed as the exterior, these buildings will add considerable
    value to the city’s apartment stock that all the glass and steel supertalls cannot compete with.

  3. Stunning. This are the most authentic, pre-war looking new construction I’ve ever seen. They make RAMSA’s buildings look like Disney impostors. Amazing…

  4. David in Bushwick | November 27, 2019 at 5:50 pm | Reply

    I walked by these two buildings a couple months ago and couldn’t believe it. They are remarkably well proportioned and beautifully executed. While the prices are crazy for most people but typical for high-end, this developer proves that glass boxed expensive housing is wearing very cheap clothing.

  5. I can’t believe RAMSA didn’t design this! And being located in Yorkville is the cherry on top!

  6. Kit Leonard Dennis | November 28, 2019 at 4:06 am | Reply

    A recent NYTimes article featured these, and a number of others like them, as a wave of opposition to the anonymous glass-box towers – a move towards more traditional solidity during uncertain times. I wish Solow Co. had got this memo before tearing down some more of the city’s real history on West 57th.

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