99 Hudson Street’s Glass and Limestone Façade Substantially Complete in Jersey City

99 Hudson Street. Photo by Michael Young

Exterior work is getting very close to completion at 99 Hudson Street in Jersey City, the 15th tallest skyscraper in our annual countdown. The gaps where the exterior hoist was attached have now been completely enclosed, and the only sections remaining are at street level around the soaring main lobby and the podium. Designed by Perkins Eastman, developed by COA 99 Hudson, LLC, and built by Plaza Construction with Vidaris overseeing the exterior envelope, the 79-story, 900-foot-tall residential tower stands as the tallest building in New Jersey.

Photos from Jersey City and across the Hudson River in Battery Park City show the multi-faceted reinforced concrete superstructure with its façade of Jura limestone and floor-to-ceiling glass.

99 Hudson Street. Photo by Michael Young

99 Hudson Street. Photo by Michael Young

99 Hudson Street. Photo by Michael Young

99 Hudson Street. Photo by Michael Young

Prices for the 781 residential units will range from $550,000 for studios to more than $4,000,000 for penthouse units offering up to 2,500 square feet of living space. A select number of homes will offer balconies. YIMBY last reported that 99 Hudson Street saw 61 units under contract between June 1 to October 17 of this year, according to the building’s exclusive marketing and sales agent The Marketing Directors. Views of the entire stretch of the Manhattan skyline, the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, the Atlantic Ocean, Jersey City to the west, and up the Hudson River can easily be seen from the tower’s upper floors. For photos of the metropolitan region, read YIMBY’s previous article and hard hat tour.

Occupancy of 99 Hudson Street is set for spring 2020.

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TFC Horizon
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3 Comments on "99 Hudson Street’s Glass and Limestone Façade Substantially Complete in Jersey City"

  1. Mechanical louvers = the bane of contemporary skyscrapers.

  2. How much better this building would have looked had they continued the limestone facade to the to the top rather than abruptly switch from limestone to glass. Major blue glass fatigue.

  3. In my opinion this one turned out a little better than the renders.

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