9 DeKalb Avenue’s Superstructure Soars Past Halfway Mark in Downtown Brooklyn

9 DeKalb Avenue. Rendering by SHoP Architects

Construction has passed the halfway mark on 9 DeKalb Avenue, a 73-story residential skyscraper in Downtown Brooklyn and the Outer Boroughs’ first supertall at 1,066 feet tall. Designed by SHoP Architects and developed by JDS, the tower will soon eclipse the 720-foot-tall architectural height of Kohn Pedersen Fox’s Brooklyn Point to secure the title of the tallest building in Brooklyn. 9 DeKalb Avenue will yield a total of 425 rental apartments and 150 condominiums.

Recent photos show the reinforced concrete superstructure standing nearly twice as tall as it was at the time of our last update in late December. Also since then, a great deal of the façade has been installed on the perimeter of the hexagonal floor plates, giving an impression of the final appearance of the curtain wall. The floor-to-ceiling glass and sleek vertical strips of stainless steel and aluminum serve to emphasize the verticality of both the envelope and the sheer height of SHoP’s design.

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

Crews have passed the first set of concrete outrigger floors above the podium that are designed to bring together the core and shell of the tower at several key points.

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

This critical structural component will be repeated two more times: one around the two-thirds mark of the superstructure, and the second several floors below the final building setbacks and crown. This is depicted in the skeletal rendering of the reinforced concrete superstructure below.

9 DeKalb Avenue. Designed by SHoP Architects

Given the pace of activity, it is possible to see 9 DeKalb Avenue top out before the end of the year. The reduction in floor size toward the crown should also help to speed up progress. The multi-story podium will make space for retail tenants and connect with the adjacent landmarked Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn.

The podium of 9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

The dome and stone details for the Dimes Savings Bank of Brooklyn. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue is anticipated to be finished around 2022.

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17 Comments on "9 DeKalb Avenue’s Superstructure Soars Past Halfway Mark in Downtown Brooklyn"

  1. David in Bushwick | April 27, 2021 at 8:15 am | Reply

    Probably the best of the crop of supertall buildings from the last decade. The shape is pre-war and almost Art Deco. The glazing is a melted version of 70s dark glass and modern glitz.
    Brooklyn will have a truly impressive skyline.

  2. David : Sent From Heaven. | April 27, 2021 at 8:46 am | Reply

    Beautiful and rich with this facade: Thanks to Michael Young.

  3. Looks nice however in this market rentals are very soft with two months free rent..
    Sale prices are down anout 15%

    Talk about bad timing.

    Hopefully it breaks even.

    Maybe there should be a moratorium on building until
    Supply is digested.

    • A moratorium on building? Because landlords aren’t willing to believe they might have to lower rents rather than just give free months and pray things return to normal? We need more housing, not less. You’re just advocating artificially constraining supply to the detriment of the already rent-burdened.

      • What’s needed is more affordable normal housing. It seems most housing constructed these days are luxury. Many of them never sellout and sit 20% to 40% empty while middle and lower class people struggle to just stay afloat. I can’t wait till this luxury housing bubble comes to a big crash. Many of the owners are not US citizens and just use them for investment. Some countries ban this practice because it makes the city unaffordable for most people.

    • A moratorium on high paying construction jobs from the private sector, yeah that makes a whole lot of sense right now.

  4. Fantastic project. And how about that Dime.

  5. Unique and powerful. I wish there was a better way to integrate louvers into the facade though.

  6. I’m speechless. 9 DeKalb Avenue is really one of the greatest New York skyscrapers to date. Awesome.

  7. elliot reisman | April 28, 2021 at 11:01 am | Reply

    you are all crazy , the streets have been crowded for the last 50 years and now all of these tall apartment buildings are coming up WHERE WILL PEOPLE BE ABLE TO WALK ON THE SREETS?

  8. I have section 8 voucher i am looking for one bedroom please send me a application thank you God bless

  9. Wonderful! Close the streets to traffic, encourage public transit and walking/biking in NYC. The world is changing fast and for good reason, urban cores finally have a chance to seize this moment.

    Cars in mass are a thing of the past. People over cars. Public space in urban areas as a priority.. Hallelujah

  10. That view from the grass across Flatbush Ave. (6th photo) will be iconic. Beautiful.

  11. What a fantastic, transformative addition to downtown Brooklyn

  12. Normally, an online search brings you to the developer’s website, and you gat a chance to see the (usually horrendously tiny and bad) individual apartment layouts. However, I can’t find any such sales or rental site for this project. Strange?

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