SOM’s 28&7 Wraps Up Construction at 322-326 Seventh Avenue in Chelsea, Manhattan

Rendering of 28 & 7 - GDSNYRendering of 28 & 7, courtesy of GDSNY

Work is nearing completion on 28&7, a 12-story office building at 322-326 Seventh Avenue in Chelsea. Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and developed by Klövern AB and GDSNY, the edifice rises at the corner of Seventh Avenue and West 28th Street and will yield 105,000 square feet of commercial space marketed by CBRE. Triton Construction is the general contractor for the reinforced concrete structure, which is located directly above the 28th Street subway station, servicing the local 1 train. The developers are aiming for LEED Gold and WELL certification.

Since our last update in June, the remainder of the gloss black terracotta façade grid panels have been installed and the scaffolding has been dismantled from around the ground floor. Only some minor finishing touches remain to be completed around the entrances.

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7’s uniform grid of triple-glazed floor-to-ceiling windows make SOM’s design appear lightweight and bright, making it a welcome architectural addition to Chelsea. The structure stands as a stark contrast to its neighbors, which include brick buildings with ornate tops and the Brutalist concrete of the Fashion Institute of Technology across the street.

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7. Photo by Michael Young

28&7 provides column-free work spaces with floor spans up to 40 feet, and the structure is topped with a 12th-floor penthouse that comes with a private panoramic garden terrace. Tenants with this external space will be able to look up toward Times Square and Central Park and down toward Lower Manhattan and the World Trade Center. Shared office amenities include ground-floor bike storage, showers, and changing stations. Other nearby subways aside from the adjacent 1 train are the 2, 3, A, C, E, NJ Transit, Long Island Railroad, and Amtrak trains at Pennsylvania Station. The R and W trains are also a short walk away to the east at 28th Street and Broadway, and the B, D, F, M, N, Q, and PATH trains are nearby at the 34th Street-Herald Square station to the northeast.

It was last reported that 28&7 is expected to be finished before the end of this year.

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14 Comments on "SOM’s 28&7 Wraps Up Construction at 322-326 Seventh Avenue in Chelsea, Manhattan"

  1. David : Sent From Heaven. | October 12, 2021 at 8:56 am | Reply

    Beautiful located at the corner of the street, it looks a live to its appearance. A welcome architectural addition, bright from outside on created windows: Thanks to Michael Young.

  2. This is an exquisite little building, despite the fact that the reflection on the glass is slightly darker than in the rendering (as someone complained in your last presentation), and, there is no way Central Park is visible from the penthouse……the materials are sexy, the scale is right for the corner overlooking FIT, and the detailing what is expected from SOM.

    • If you lean waaaayyy out over the edge of the building from the penthouse you can just about see Times Sq and Central Pk.

      • waay out and a Macy’s is in view. Times Sq with a telescope…..never CP, and I am not sure why the author of the article needed to offer that as a feature as the building is what it is and it’s just fine the way it is!! Maybe he will reply.

  3. Nice but not to scale. The overall block remains highly unbalanced. Too many large “dumb” walls around. Was there a construction rights issue?

    • David in Bushwick | October 12, 2021 at 11:20 am | Reply

      Placing windows into a wall that is built right on the lot line is a gamble. If and when your neighbor builds something taller right next to you, you lose those windows. Building, destroying and rebuilding is NYC’s biggest industry.

      • its a fire code no to put lot line windows in….why is that even a question here? scale? Lior – perhaps the other buildings on the block to the west don’t have scale..but what does it have to do with this building? Did you mean this building should have been taller? Perhaps, but maybe then the core gets larger so the rentable space becomes an issue and so on….why not just consider the building as it is?

        • Each building is built within context. The specific context here is an unbalanced city block. It results in too many dead inner facades seen from sidewalk spots. I am trying to understand if this is the outcome of lack of sufficient construction rights (=less overall built floor area)

  4. Good work SOM. Contrast this with the junk facades of so many mid-town spec buildings. It holds the corner with a refreshing neo-modernist rigor — rather like SOM’s almost-ancient Pepsico building at 59th & Park — and it’s not too big.

  5. It’s a great smaller building. Not at all filler. Very strong design, what with the use of stunning black terra cotta. Great work, SOM!

  6. Ah, the 60s SOM. Very nice.

  7. Beautiful

    BUT

    I still think it should of wedding caked up about three or four more floors. The older building next door seems to crowd it.

  8. Interesting this striking development contributed what appears to be zero investment in improving the subway entrance it literally touches. Would any other world city allow such a thing?

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