Plans Unveiled for Manhattan’s First Public Beach in Hudson River Park

Rendering of Beach in the Gansevoort Peninsula at Hudson River ParkRendering of Beach in the Gansevoort Peninsula at Hudson River Park. All renderings by James Corner Field Operations

The former Department of Sanitation facility on the Gansevoort Peninsula in Hudson River Park will soon be a 5.65-acre park with a beach. This week Hudson River Park Trust unveiled renderings of the public space designed by James Corner Field Operations, also responsible for the High Line, South Street Seaport, Greenpoint Landing, and Domino Park.

The park will include a variety of amenities including a sports field, salt marsh, habitats, a sandy beach with kayak access, and sitting and entertaining areas that span from Gansevoort Street to Little West 12th Street along what is essentially 13th Avenue. According to Curbed, to acknowledge the site’s history, the parkland will also include Day’s End, a public art installation created by David Hammonds and commissioned by the Whitney Museum.

Rendering of the Gansevoort Peninsula at Hudson River Park

Rendering of the Gansevoort Peninsula at Hudson River Park

Rendering of Habitats in the Gansevoort Peninsula at Hudson River Park.

Aerial View of Rendering of Gansevoort Peninsula at Hudson River Park

Aerial View of Rendering of Gansevoort Peninsula at Hudson River Park

Although the preliminary plans have been announced, the design has yet to be finalized. Construction is expected to start in late 2020 and be completed by middle of 2022.

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4 Comments on "Plans Unveiled for Manhattan’s First Public Beach in Hudson River Park"

  1. The water has found happiness from people, I think it’s meant to be a recreation. This includes a developer’s idea of changing. (Hello YIMBY)

  2. Would anyone actually swim in the Hudson?

  3. Timothy Bambrough | July 29, 2019 at 2:21 pm | Reply

    It’s about time they do something with the space that was slated to be an Olympic venue when NYC city was trying to get the games here.

  4. Note the beach is not a real beach, you cannot access the water from it. It’s a faux beach, an “urban beach”, and quite literally copied from one in Jersey City right down to the adirondack chairs and the steel umbrellas. That beach itself was copied from ones in Toronto and Montreal, which themselves were reinterpreted from the Paris Plage project and others in Europe.

    Would be nice if someone acknowledged all that when reviewing the design.

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