A New Courtyard by Marriott Opens at 461 West 34th Street in Hudson Yards

461 West 34th Street Exterior461 West 34th Street Exterior

The Hudson Yards section of Midtown West is now home to a new, 399-key Courtyard by Marriott hotel. The 28-story building is located at 461 West 34th Street and will be managed by property owner Endeavor Hospitality Group. The project team also includes Marx Development Group and architect DSM Design Group.

Located conveniently close to the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, the hotel will primarily be marketed to the business community, conference attendees, and other corporate clients.

“From day one, Courtyard has prided itself as a brand that listens to business travelers,” said Janis Milham, senior vice president and global brand leader, Classic Select Brands at Marriott International. “Today’s technology has changed how people travel. Our guests want a room that has purpose and flexibility that enables a seamless transition between relaxing and working. Courtyard is designed to offer them a relaxing and functional space to work the way they want to, when they want to.”

Guests amenities include a business library with computers, a bar and full-service restaurant, a round-the-clock fitness center, laundry facilities, and 1,700 square feet of meeting space to accommodate functions of up to 90 people.

A portion of the ground floor will be activated by an unspecified retail component.

Rendering of retail amenities at 461 West 34th Street

Rendering of retail amenities at 461 West 34th Street

Rendering of entryway at 461 West 34th Street

Rendering of entryway at 461 West 34th Street

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3 Comments on "A New Courtyard by Marriott Opens at 461 West 34th Street in Hudson Yards"

  1. Gene Kaufman, are you watching? Notice how you don’t need to do those ugly setbacks or wacky patterns and colors?

  2. In Gene’s defense, the ugly setbacks are out of his hands as the city requires them through the DOB’s misguided and indifferent-to-aesthetic-outcomes sky-plane building codes.

  3. Meh, this isn’t really much better than a Gene Kaufman design.

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