Google’s Office at 550 Washington Street Nears Topping Out in Hudson Square

Rendering of 550 Washington Street by COOKFOX Architects

Construction is nearing topping out at 550 Washington Street, Google’s 1.3 million-square-foot office in Hudson Square. Designed by COOKFOX Architects and developed by Oxford Properties, the facility will join two other nearby structures at 315 Hudson Street and 345 Hudson Street to form a 1.7 million-square-foot hub dubbed the “Googleplex.” The site is bound by West Street, West Houston Street, Washington Street, and the New York Department of Sanitation offices.

Recent photos show the tremendous amount of progress that has occurred since YIMBY’s last update in late February, when partial demolition for the massive St. John’s Terminal was still underway.

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

Work on the extensive floor-to-ceiling glass curtain wall for the multi-level expansion has not begun yet, and won’t commence until the ongoing fireproofing of the steel frame is finished. The exterior of the terminal is covered in black netting and scaffolding. A one-story extension of 550 Washington Street is depicted in the main rendering and appears to be in the process of being structurally assembled. An outdoor landscaped rooftop terrace will cap the relatively flat parapet.

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

550 Washington Street. Photo by Michael Young

The northern profile of the building is depicted to be enclosed in a glass envelope with a tight grid of dark mullions. The transparent fenestration is set back from West Houston Street to partially leave one open-air column of industrial windows on the eastern and western sides of the old terminal superstructure. This also makes room for a decorative steel canopy made of multiple girders that cantilevers above the ground-floor entrance. Overhanging shrubbery and greenery are scattered among the setbacks, the exposed steel elements, the edges of the floor plates, and sidewalks.

Rendering of 550 Washington Street by COOKFOX Architects

Rendering of 550 Washington Street by COOKFOX Architects

YIMBY last reported that 315 Hudson Street and 345 Hudson Street are slated to open in 2020, while 550 Washington Street is slated to finish in May 2022.

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8 Comments on "Google’s Office at 550 Washington Street Nears Topping Out in Hudson Square"

  1. In the last picture (rendering) it seems the addition on top does not fit perfectly square on the base of the old terminal. Is the case or is the image just from a peculiar angle?

  2. I love the name “Googleplex,” first of all. Second, I think this building looks great. I especially like the shrubbery that covers the building. Very great addition to the City.

  3. Does anyone know if this will be exclusively office space, or will there by any storefronts or any other community use?

  4. Architect’s dream..
    Having G-d as your client.

  5. Randall Cummings | October 26, 2020 at 3:40 pm | Reply

    I hope the future Tekkies that will inhabit this structure will help save us all.

  6. There is no local infrastructure to support this kind of an influx. The overcrowding will most likely be oppressive. I’ll wait until the market is at it’s Googleplex peak, and sell for top dollar to some spoiled millennial google executive.

  7. Will the windows be dark enough so that thousands of migrating birds don’t crash into them and die?

  8. OneNYersOpinion | October 29, 2020 at 8:02 am | Reply

    An impressive transition from this structure’s days as the Merrill Lynch Data Center in the 90s. A spot-on change metaphor from the neighborhood’s pre-Hudson River Park days.

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