The Spiral’s Glass Façade Reaches Roof Parapet at 66 Hudson Boulevard in Hudson Yards, Manhattan

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral‘s glass curtain wall is closing in on the final floors of the 66-story, 1,041-foot-tall commercial supertall at 66 Hudson Boulevard in Hudson Yards. Designed by Bjarke Ingels Group and developed by Tishman Speyer, the property occupies a full block between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues and 34th and 35th Streets, and is poised to provide a massive 2.85 million square feet of office space to Midtown, Manhattan. Turner Construction Company is serving as the construction manager, Banker Steel is in charge of manufacturing the steel, and Permasteelisa is the contractor for the reflective enclosure. The Spiral is expected to cost around $3.7 billion.

Recent photos showcase the progress since our last update in late March, when the façade only enclosed about two-thirds of the superstructure.

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The envelope at the pinnacle started to be installed at the western corner of the steel superstructure. We can spot the first portion of the vertical slits that signify the mechanical roof. Meanwhile, the first outdoor terraces are being landscaped and filled with trees and shrubs, some overhanging on the metal railings. A nice detail that has been incorporated with the overall glass skin is the distinction in transparency among the floor-to-ceiling panels that meet with the terraces. This makes the spiraling effect more pronounced and highlights the architectural concept of winding greenery across all four sides of the supertall from the base to the crown.

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

Installation of the glass on the eastern profile is not too far behind.

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral (right). Photo by Michael Young

The two exterior hoists remain attached to the wide northern and southern elevations of The Spiral, and will likely remain until the façade is complete and more of the office interiors are fitted out.

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral currently stands as the tallest building to the north of Related Companies’ first phase of Hudson Yards. It will likely hold that title for a number of years and remain a dominant figure in the skyline, especially when viewed from across the Hudson River from Weehawken, New Jersey and around the general waterfront area. 66 Hudson Boulevard is the tallest realized design by Bjarke Ingels in New York City.

Work on The Spiral is predicted to finish sometime in 2022.

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16 Comments on "The Spiral’s Glass Façade Reaches Roof Parapet at 66 Hudson Boulevard in Hudson Yards, Manhattan"

  1. David in Bushwick | July 5, 2021 at 8:36 am | Reply

    It’s a one trick design that quickly becomes very boring.

    • Yes absolutely, I would’ve rather had the Hudson Spire, which made the most sense.

    • Shane C Keena | July 5, 2021 at 11:02 am | Reply

      It’s more that the glass and steel look isn’t trading like it did even 10 years ago, and amenities like terraces and indoor-outdoor flow are now more widely available so they don’t sell as strong. Now, tenants are looking for something more. A unique look that is undoubtedly New York. This is where they really should complete the MetLife North Building.

  2. Every time I look at this box with some ribbon around it, I think of what could’ve been, the mega tall, the Hudson Spire. The location was perfect for a mega tall as there isn’t many in NYC for one.

  3. “The Spiral currently stands as the tallest building to the north of Related Companies’ first phase of Hudson Yards,” are you sure? I can think of half a dozen supertalls north of Hudson Yards… Maybe “immediately north of…”?

  4. What an ugly ****ing building. It has now taken away the title of my most hated building in NY from the Hearst.

  5. Wow. This building is very imposing. Yet, I think it looks so cool. It’s also impressive how quickly the construction of The Spiral is going too. I remember not too long ago, it was just the foundations. Nice.

  6. The spiral aspect of this building is quite underwhelming.

  7. Given the fact that many office workers will be working from home, and that Manhattan already has one of the highest vacancy rates in the country, I think Hudson Yards will be looking at lots of empty space.

    Couldn’t happen to a “nicer” company

    • Many will NOT be working at home. Working-at-home allowed companies to stay alive during the virus, but its NOT a long-term, new paradigm for prosperity. Too many pitfalls, for both employee and employer, as time is increasingly showing. As Barry Diller has said “You cannot run a global corporation from people’s living rooms.” And if so many will be working at home, why are both tech-centric Disney and Google constructing office buildings in Manhattan?
      As for the higher vacancies, ask Mayor DeBlasio about continued keeping employees at home.

  8. The Spiral is another glass box

  9. I am interested in the position like Maintenance cleaning poter position I have more experience for that like 08 years to 09 years experience cleaning Maintenance poter position

  10. David : Sent From Heaven. | July 6, 2021 at 3:22 am | Reply

    Allowing light but not detailed shapes, I know what is up to prominent progress; beautiful see-through: Thanks to Michael Young.

  11. Strange neighborhood, but great development

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