The Spiral’s Glass Curtain Wall Continues Ascent at 66 Hudson Boulevard in Hudson Yards, Manhattan

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

Exterior work is progressing on The Spiral, a 66-story, 1,041-foot-tall commercial supertall at 66 Hudson Boulevard in Hudson Yards. Designed by Bjarke Ingels Group and developed by Tishman Speyer, the structure occupies a full block between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues and 34th and 35th Streets and is poised to yield a whopping 2.85 million square feet of office space. Turner Construction Company is serving as the construction manager, Banker Steel is in charge of manufacturing the steel, and Permasteelisa is the contractor for the glass enclosure for the project, which is expected to cost $3.7 billion.

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

Recent photographs show the climbing assembly of glass panels continuing to distinguish the signature stepped terraces, which will serve as landscaped amenity spaces for every office floor. About two-thirds of The Spiral is now enclosed, while the upper portion is quickly undergoing the process of fireproofing. Parts of the safety cocoon netting remain around the perimeter of the flat roof parapet and should steadily be removed piece by piece as work progresses on the steel crown. It’s likely that the entire envelope will be fully in place in the coming months, probably by mid to late summer. It will also be a matter of time before we start to see the construction cranes being removed.

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral. Photo by Michael Young

The Spiral stands as the tallest building to the north of Related Companies’ first phase of Hudson Yards and will likely hold that title for a number of years. There are several other nearby high rises under construction, mostly around Eleventh Avenue by the Jacob K. Javits Center. However these will be nowhere near the supertall height of BIG’s design, which is currently Bjarke Ingel’s tallest realized design in New York City.

The Spiral is predicted to finish construction sometime in 2022.

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17 Comments on "The Spiral’s Glass Curtain Wall Continues Ascent at 66 Hudson Boulevard in Hudson Yards, Manhattan"

  1. Wow! Construction is really going fast with The Spiral!
    But, boy do I love it. I just can’t get over the hulking presence that it has. I also love the clean and shiny glass, and the of course the spiral itself.
    So, whether you like it or not, I think The Spiral will almost certainly be a New York icon in the years to come.

    • PS: When will YIMBY make an update on 9 DeKalb Avenue? It has been a while.

      • David in Bushwick | March 29, 2021 at 9:36 am | Reply

        I just went by 9 DeKalb last week and it’s progressing very fast. It will soon be taller than the surrounding buildings. The window panels are also going up fast, maybe too fast as some of them don’t align. Oops.

  2. A few years ago it appeared that 3 Hudson Blvd. would rise first, thus blocking the Spiral. In fact, the foundation for 3 Hudson Blvd. was completed a few months ahead of the Spiral.

    So it’s great that we have these unobstructed views of this supertall for now, but does YIMBY have any updates on 3 Hudson Blvd?

    • Believe construction is on hold, as the foundation work is completed, but nothing is active on site (think World Trade Center #2)

  3. David : Sent From Heaven. | March 29, 2021 at 9:17 am | Reply

    The density of tall buildings from man-made, with large buildings by the amount of investment; so powerful skyline: Thanks to Michael Young.

  4. David in Bushwick | March 29, 2021 at 9:32 am | Reply

    It’s a very big glass box with some trees that might survive.

  5. confused in st louis | March 29, 2021 at 10:27 am | Reply

    The vent louvers for the mechanical floors take away from the “spiral” effect, but still nicer than what’s going up across the street.

  6. So bored of blue glass buildings. Can anyone think of anything new. Yawn.

  7. Why are NY skyscrapers always of such conservative design, even from Ingels? I wish that they would connect all the terraces with stairs so that you could climb from the ground to the top. Now that would really be thinking outside the box, literally.

  8. How soon when it will ready

  9. Why do they call the building a spiral when it’s a rectangle? It’s clearly not spiral in any way shape or form.

  10. Technically not a full block as the article outlines. It goes from 10th Ave to Hudson Blvd, not all the way to 11th Ave.

  11. A year into the pandemic with only 10% of Manhattan office space occupied do they really believe they will be able to rent 2.85 million square feet of office space? That people will want to return to working in offices? Especially ones so far removed from public transportation? And there are dozens of competing office space projects in Manhattan.

  12. Meh, but better than Foster & Partners ungainly retro low end ’70’s monstrosity next door. The jam pile of lumpen giants at Hudson Yards proves once again the sublime greatness of Rockefeller Center. Rockefeller Center wrote the book on urbane planning and architecture, to which the developers and architects of Hudson Yards are entirely oblivious.

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