Construction Wraps Up on Tin Building at 95 Marginal Street in Seaport District, Manhattan

Updated rendering of 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) - Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors - [From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of illuminated signage at 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings - Roman & Williams Buildings and InteriorsUpdated rendering of 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) - Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors - [From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of illuminated signage at 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings - Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

Exterior work is nearing completion on the Tin Building, a three-story commercial building at 95 Marginal Street on Pier 17 in the South Street Seaport District. Designed by SHoP Architects and developed by Howard Hughes Corporation with Plaza Construction as construction manager, the facility will open with a seafood-themed market by Jean-Georges Vongerichten, the main tenant of the low rise building. The 53,000-square-foot structure is located to the east of South Street and the elevated FDR Drive.

A number of finishing touches have gone up since our last update in early March, particularly on the columns below the roof parapet, which are now adorned with ornamentation. The green construction fence still surrounds the property, but should be disassembled soon.

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

It also appears that the mechanical equipment and systems atop the roof have been installed, along with the remainder of the industrial-style windows and operable walls below the canopy that stretches the length of the main western elevation.

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Tin Building. Photo by Michael Young

Meanwhile, to the north the Fulton Fish Market is in the process of being demolished. Photos show the skeletal outline of the building and its steel-framed superstructure as more of the outer and inner walls torn down. The whole building should likely be fully dismantled before the end of the year.

The former Fulton fish Market. Photo by Michael Young

The former Fulton Fish Market. Photo by Michael Young

The former Fulton fish Market. Photo by Michael Young

The former Fulton Fish Market. Photo by Michael Young

Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors proposals to install new signage and illuminated canopies on the Tin Building is still being reviewed by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). Renderings below depict what the designers envisioned for the retail and dining establishment. Click here to read more about this.

[From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings - Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

[From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings – Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

[From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings - Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

[From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings – Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

[From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of illuminated signage at 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings - Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

[From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of illuminated signage at 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings – Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

[From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of canopy signage at 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings - Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

[From left to right] View of previously submitted renderings of canopy signage at 95 Marginal Street (The Tin Building) and current renderings – Roman & Williams Buildings and Interiors

A formal completion date for the Tin Building has not been announced, though YIMBY predicts sometime in early 2022.

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10 Comments on "Construction Wraps Up on Tin Building at 95 Marginal Street in Seaport District, Manhattan"

  1. David in Bushwick | September 7, 2021 at 8:52 am | Reply

    It will look better with a little dirt on it.

  2. This neighborhood still needs a lot of help and clean up. Needs better access to the water.

  3. David : Sent From Heaven. | September 7, 2021 at 9:26 am | Reply

    There was a big part of its rendering, that agreed on all designs needed to do. You could offer no words, that you would make me understand. So smile in appreciation of detailed changing: Thanks to Michael Young.

  4. It is funny how the more we ‘preserve’ historical building the less historical and accurate they become.

  5. I love the historically accurate window air conditioners.

  6. Tough crowd in the comments. Looks fantastic.

  7. “Marginal Street”…quite the name.

  8. Whenever I see the new Tin Building, it just gives me a smile. I think this modernization has been done fantastically. What is not to be loved about it?

  9. Beautiful, how much is restoration vs new construction? And somehow I thought the Fulton Fish Market was going to be preserved.

  10. This is one of those times where zoning and preservation are really useful tools. This is great. I am always dismayed at previous generations that thought Darth Vader monoliths on Pearl St. would be a good addition to this area (land value and land use appropriateness aside). It’s nice that the city has carved out this small slice to remind us a bit of what it was like and to keep it that way. Good job.

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