Office-to-residential conversion


Rendering of immersive exhibition space 'Hall Des Lumieres' - Culturespaces / Woods Bagot

LPC to Review Proposal for Immersive Museum at the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank, in Lower Manhattan

The Landmarks Preservation Commission is scheduled to review a proposal to partially renovate and repurpose the ground floor areas of the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank in Lower Manhattan into an immersive digital museum and gallery. Titled “Hall Des Lumieres,” the exhibition would feature 3D projections of the works of famed Austrian painter Gustav Klimt and would require architectural modifications to both the building’s façade and landmarked interiors.

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New Renderings Revealed for 200 Montague Street As Revised Plan Heads Back to LPC, in Borough Hall

New York City-based architecture firm Beyer Blinder Belle has returned to the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission with revised proposals to construct a new high-rise development within Brooklyn’s Borough Hall Skyscraper Historic District. The building was formerly referred to as 192 Montague Street, but has been presented to the commission on the second try as 200 Montague Street.

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A Detailed Look at the Recently Completed Luna LIC, Office-to-Residential Conversion at 42-15 Crescent Street, Long Island City

Office-to-residential conversions are usually expected of ornate, pre-war high-rises, or tall-ceiling industrial lofts. Such conversions are much more rare at mid-century office buildings, particularly ones that had no redeeming architectural value in the first place. Long Island City’s Luna LIC became one of the city’s only such projects when it opened its doors earlier this year. The nine-story office building was built in 1955 at 42-15 Crescent Street, at the foot of the Queensboro Bridge. Over the past few years, Meadow Partners redeveloped the property into an 11-story, 124-unit rental, and sold it to World Wide Group for a hefty profit. The architects at Avinash K. Malhotra Architects, also known as AKM Architects, opted for minimal intervention, rather than a total structural overhaul, which was sufficient to transform the poorly-aged eyesore into the latest addition to the growing residential community around Court Square.

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