Features

45 East 22nd Street

Interview With the Developer: Bruce Eichner on 45 East 22nd Street, The Evolution of the Flatiron, And Continuum’s Future Plans

With the soon-to-be 777-foot-tall 45 East 22nd Street now climbing quickly into the Flatiron District’s skyline, YIMBY sat down with developer Bruce Eichner to discuss the building’s progress, the surrounding neighborhood’s rapid evolution, as well as what else might be on the horizon for Continuum. YIMBY in bold.

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The New Kosciuszko Bridge Appears on the Skyline

Within the past few months, motorists on the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and nearby residents witnessed the rise of a tower crane to the east of the Kosciuszko Bridge, followed by two concrete pillars. They are seeing the progress on the east span of the Kosciuszko Bridge Replacement, the city’s first major new bridge since the Verrazano-Narrows opened over half a century ago in 1964.

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A rendering of the city's vision for Flushing West from the 7 train tracks. image via Department of City Planning

City Unveils Details on Flushing West Rezoning: A Waterfront Promenade and a Possible Bus Terminal

The polluted waterfront blocks in eastern Queens known as Flushing West are an industrial wasteland: vacant lots, warehouses, a scrap metal business, a lumber yard, a U-Haul rental. But the city hosted a meeting Wednesday night laying out its plan to rezone the 10-block swath along Flushing Creek and revitalize the area with new residential development.

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The Death and Life of the Bancroft Building, 1896-2015

Since New York’s earliest days, church organizations have held a considerable amount of the city’s real estate, which they use not only for direct religious services, but also as a means of generating income. Over the past year, we witnessed the destruction of one of the oldest properties of the kind, as the 119 year old Bancroft Building has been reduced to a pile of red brick rubble.

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Long Island City: Finally, an Emerging Skyline

Satellite skylines across the water from Manhattan are a curious phenomenon: they appear to stay frozen in time for decades until they hit sudden, and typically large, growth spurts. As Lower Manhattan was still reeling from the tragedy of 9/11, Jersey City sprouted a forest of cranes. East of the Financial District, the current decade has ushered Downtown Brooklyn’s skyscraper renaissance, as its solitary peaks are now morphing into manmade canyons. Yet as 2015 draws to a close, Long Island City is set to command development watchers’ attention, and the region’s perpetual skyline underdog is about to undergo a complete overhaul.

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