Downtown

350 East 10th Street

Five-Story, 225-Unit Student Dorm Conversion Moves Forward at 350 East 10th Street, East Village

Singer Financial Corporation is finally moving forward with redeveloping the long-vacant former P.S. 64 facility at 350 East 10th Street, in the East Village, into a 225-unit student dormitory. The developer recently secured a $44 million loan for the project, dubbed University House, Commercial Observer reported. The 152,000-square-foot building, an individual landmark, will be able to accommodate 535 students for the Cooper Union and the Joffrey Ballet School. Amenities include a fitness center, outdoor terraces, storage for 113 bikes, laundry facilities, a student health center, a private study, a lounge, and a café. TriBeCa-based Curtis + Ginsberg Architects is the architect of record. Redevelopment of the property, acquired in 1999 for $3.15 million, has been in legal limbo for the past few years. Exterior alterations to the building were approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in June of 2013.


Rendering of 125 Greenwich Street. Via Bizzi & Partners Development

New Renderings Confirm 125 Greenwich Street’s Supertall Status

Less than two weeks ago, the foundation was completed for a new mixed-use tower in the Financial District. Now, new renderings are out for the building going up at 125 Greenwich Street, thanks to the eagle-eyed contributors on the YIMBY Forums, and they would appear to confirm a final height exceeding 1,000 feet, given the tower will stand taller than the nearby 977-foot-tall 4 World Trade Center at 150 Greenwich Street.

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252 South Street

New Video Shows 252 South Street’s Impact on the Manhattan Skyline

There are only a few locations outside of Midtown and the Financial District that support supertall (or near supertall) development. The newest such location is the far Lower East Side, where Extell’s 252 South Street, also known as One Manhattan Square, is now rising. While several renderings of the project have been revealed, YIMBY now has a full video of the soon-to-be skyscraper and its impact on the Manhattan skyline, posted on the YIMBY Forums and also on Curbed.

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Water Street Rezoning

City Council Approves Rezoning Proposal Allowing Pedestrian Arcade-to-Retail Conversions Along Water Street, Financial District

Earlier this week, the City Council voted to approve a rezoning proposal that would allow landlords of the commercial properties with public pedestrian arcades along Water Street, between Fulton and Whitehall streets in the Financial District, to convert the arcades into retail space in exchange for renovating adjacent public plazas. The total amount of space that could be converted spans 110,000 square feet across 20 buildings, DNAinfo reported. The rezoning requires retail conversions of greater than 7,500 square feet to be approved through the city’s Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP). It also limits the amount of street frontage chain banks and drugstores can take up, and requires the entire height of the arcade to be built out. Future renovations to the existing public plazas in the area could include new seating and planters, among other upgrades.


11 Hubert Street

LPC Approves Five-Story, Single-Family Mega-Mansion at 11 Hubert Street, TriBeCa

A five-story, single-family mega-mansion project at 11 Hubert Street, in TriBeCa, technically an expansion and redevelopment of an existing three-story mixed-use structure, has received approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, Curbed NY reported. The project’s design, which has seen minor changes since a previous proposal from January, is the work of Maya Lin Studio and Bialosky + Partners Architects. The latest filings with the Buildings Department detail a 55,080-square-foot mansion fit with five bedrooms, a private pool in the cellar, a landscaped courtyard, and a 5,000-square-foot fitness center. The family behind the project has not yet been disclosed, nor has a construction timeline. The site sits within the TriBeCa West Historic District, which is why approval from the LPC was required.


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