Downtown

435 East 13th Street

First Look At Eight-Story, 114-Unit Mixed-Use Project At 435 East 13th Street, East Village

In the final days of 2014, YIMBY reported on applications for an eight-story, 114-unit mixed-use building at 435 East 13th Street (a.k.a 432-438 East 14th Street), in the East Village, and nearly a year later, crews demolished the site’s old two-story post office building. Now, EV Grieve has the first glimpse of the project, which will encompass 135,186 square feet and two buildings, per the latest filings. Located on both ends of the block-thru parcel, each building will feature 8,700 square feet of ground-floor retail space. The residential units will average 769 square feet apiece and 20 percent of them will rent at below market-rates. Benenson Capital Partners and Mack Real Estate Group are developing, and SLCE Architects is designing the project. Completion is anticipated for early 2017.


A rendering of the proposal for 46-74 Gansevoort Street as seen from the Whitney Museum of American Art. All renderings courtesy BKSK Architects.

Architects Tout Gansevoort Market Plan As Return to History

In November, a plan for a commercial revitalization of the south side of a block of Gansevoort Street, in the Meatpacking District, went before the Landmarks Preservation Commission. In a rare, but hardly unheard of occurrence, the hearing was paused before the commissioners could discuss the proposal. With the continuation of that session likely to come soon, YIMBY sat down with the architects behind it to talk about its place in the history of the area.

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388-390 Greenwich Street

Citigroup In Contract To Acquire Their 39-Story, 2.7-Million Square-Foot Headquarters At 388-390 Greenwich Street, TriBeCa

In early 2015, renderings were revealed of the planned renovations at Citigroup’s headquarters at 388-390 Greenwich Street, in TriBeCa, and now the company is in contract to acquire the the 39-story, 2.7-million square-foot office complex. According to Real Estate Weekly, Citigroup will purchase the properties from SL Green Realty Corp. for $2 billion. The renovations include connecting the tower portion at 388 Greenwich to the 10-story structure at 390 Greenwich. The transformation will include a new façade on large portions of the existing buildings, a single lobby that serves both sections, plaza renovations, a rooftop terrace, and amenities like a fitness center. The sale is expected to close in December of 2017 and renovations should be complete by 2019.


126 Forsyth Street

Four-Story Church At 126 Forsyth Street Seeking Partner For New Mixed-Use Building, Lower East Side

The Spanish Delancey Seventh Day Adventist Church, located at the four-story building at 126 Forsyth Street, on the corner of Delancey Street on the Lower East Side, is looking for a development partner that would demolish the existing structure for a new building. The 5,000 square-foot lot could accommodate a new mixed-use building of up to 32,500 square feet, where a maximum of 27,000 square feet could be used as residential space. The lot is subject to a 120-foot height cap, according to Curbed NY. The church is requiring the first three floors of the new building to be designed, owned, and operated by the church as a house of worship, although zoning allows for retail space to be built as well. It should be noted that the rest of the building could potentially end up being a hotel or office space if a developer chooses against building residential units.


61-63 Crosby Street

Developer Plans Four-Story Office, Retail Conversion At 61-63 Crosby Street, SoHo

Chicago-based L3 Capital has acquired the four-story, 20,600-square-foot mixed-use property at 61-63 Crosby Street, in SoHo, for $42 million. The new owner plans to convert the building into office space, although the ground-floor will remain as retail space. The co-op building has seven apartments, which will all be vacated before the sale closes, according to The Real Deal. The property comes with 3,300 square feet of air rights, which could be used in an expansion. Any alterations to the buildings will have to be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission because they sit within the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District Extension.


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