Retail

145 madison avenue midtown south

21-Story, 71-Unit Project At 145 Madison Avenue To Include Affordable Units, Midtown South

Back in May, YIMBY reported on applications for a 21-story, 71-unit mixed-use building at 145 Madison Avenue, between East 31st and 32nd Streets in Midtown South. According to DNAinfo, Kahen Properties will rent 21 of the residential units at below-market rates, which would satisfy the inclusionary housing bonus and increase the project’s allowable FAR. The latest filings call for a 59,085 square-foot structure, which includes 2,779 square feet of retail on the ground floor and residential units averaging 793 square feet each. The Stephen B. Jacobs Group is the architect of record. Permits have been approved to demolish the existing six-story commercial building.



Times Square Toys “R” Us, Once World’s Largest Toy Store, To Close December 30

2015 will go down in New York’s storied retail history as the year when the city lost two of its flagship toy stores. At 6:00 p.m. on December 30, Toys “R” Us will shut down its Times Square store at West 44th Street and Broadway. The retail giant decided not to renew the lease due to ever-rising rents in the pedestrian-heavy neighborhood. Earlier in July, the company closed the famous FAO Schwarz store on at 767 Fifth Avenue, which had served the city since 1986.

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Construction at FRANK 57WEST, 600 West 58th Street. Photo by Tectonic.

Construction Update: FRANK 57WEST Rises On The Far West Side

If you’ve gone up the West Side Highway in Manhattan or up Port Imperial Boulevard in New Jersey, you’ve probably noticed the Durst Organization-developed Bjarke Ingels Group-designed Via tetrahedron. Not only is it visually striking, there has been a fair amount of press coverage. Additionally, its next-door neighbor, the high-rise Helena has been there for a decade now. But they are not the only Durst developments on the block bounded by Eleventh Avenue, West 57th Street, Twelfth Avenue, and West 58th Street.

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Some of biggest current adaptive reuse projects: St. Ann's Warehouse (via Curbed NY), 111 West 57th Street, Tammany Hall, 10 Jay Street, and 28 Liberty Street

LPC Chair, Top Architects Review NYC’s Adaptive Reuse Projects

The New York City landmarks law was signed 50 years ago this year. So, what better time to talk about some of its successes? Plenty of great structures, such as the Empire State Building, completed in 1931 as a multi-tenant office building, are easy to keep relevant and functioning. Others, however, become obsolete and can no longer perform their originally intended purpose. That’s where adaptive reuse comes in. If you haven’t heard the term, it’s when an old structure is adapted for a new use. It’s often how we are saving our great city.

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