Construction Update: 560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street

Construction is making headway at 560 West 24th Street — aka the NY Art Residences — which Tavros Capital is developing. The architect of record is Montroy Andersen DeMarco. While on-site signage indicates the address is 560 West 24th, permits are actually filed under a different bin — separate from the Sky Garage — at 552 West 24th Street.

560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street — image from the official website

Renderings were posted with the signage, and the concept is promising; 560 West 24th Street is the second structure on its block to offer a contemporary take on classic design, though the final product at the Tavros site — clad in limestone — will be a significant departure from its cast-concrete cousin at 508 West 24th Street. Despite the difference in facades, both sites will appeal to a similar ultra-high-end buyer, and Curbed posted an in-depth look inside the NY Art Residences following the sales launch.

560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street will have eight units in total, with residences averaging over 3,500 square feet apiece. The ground floor will have an art gallery, with each floor above housing a single condominium; there will be two duplexes atop the structure, and its roof will stand 137 feet above the street. With eleven stories in total, ceiling heights will be generous, and floor-plans will be more than spacious.

560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street

The Art Residences will continue the trend towards super-luxury development in the lower West 20s, where starchitect brands have been yielding to subtle yet equally appealing creations by lesser-known architects. Completion is expected this November.

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Posted in 560 West 24th Street | Architecture | Chelsea | Construction Update | Midtown | Montroy Andersen DeMarco | New York | NY Art Residences | Residential | Tavros Capital

Revealed: 959 First Avenue

959 First Avenue rendering

The first renderings for 959 First Avenue have been posted on-site, giving a detailed look at Toll Brothers City Living’s latest project to begin construction in Manhattan; Incorporated NY is the design architect, while Goldstein Hill & West is the architectural firm of record, per filings with the Department of Buildings.

Permits indicate the mixed-use structure will have 197,127 square feet in total, and 9,569 square feet will be dedicated to ground floor retail. The remainder of the project will be divided between 114 residences, and the 30-story building’s pinnacle will stand 333 feet above the street.

959 First Avenue

Foundation work

959 First Avenue’s design will benefit the neighborhood, which has long existed in architectural limbo on the periphery of Midtown. With much of the existing pre-war stock run-down, the area’s modernization and continued development is a definite boon, and the plans for Toll Brothers’ building will both respect the site’s surrounds and add to its urban dynamic.

959 First Avenue

959 First Avenue, site overview

While Goldstein Hill & West tend towards the modern end of design, the firm’s scheme for 959 First Avenue definitely has historicist elements, with casement windows featuring prominently; the concept almost looks like a residential take on the McGraw Hill Building in Midtown West, minus the green facade. 959 First Avenue’s aesthetics will add to the neighborhood, and the project will also enhance the street-wall along First Avenue, providing new retail space that will enliven the pedestrian sphere.

959 First Avenue

959 First Avenue

Per on-site signage, completion of 959 First Avenue is expected in the fall of 2016.

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Posted in 959 First Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Goldstein Hill West | Midtown | Midtown East | New York | Residential | Toll Brothers

Permits Filed: 75 Ralph Avenue

75 Ralph Avenue -- via Google Maps

The first DOB filings are up for a six-story residential development at 75 Ralph Avenue, in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood; the developer is Solomon Feder of 75 Ralph LLC, and the architect is Charles Mallea. An existing laundromat on-site will be demolished to make way for the new structure, with permits for its demise issued late last month.

75 Ralph Avenue

75 Ralph Avenue — via Google Maps

While Mallea’s site lacks renderings of 75 Ralph Avenue, Curbed has a reveal of another development the architect is involved with, at 482 Seneca Avenue in Ridgewood. If that project is any indication, Mallea’s Bed-Stuy building may tend towards a bland-contemporary aesthetic.

Bed-Stuy is home to an extensive amount of pre-war architecture, and something at 75 Ralph Avenue that considers the neighborhood context would be ideal, if unlikely. Regardless of the design, a nearly-vacant lot will still be transformed into much-needed housing, resulting in a net-positive for the surrounding area.

Permits indicate that 75 Ralph Avenue will measure 38,462 square feet, and the entirety of the structure will be residential; the building will be split between 57 units, and it will stand 69 feet tall.

Massey Knakal has a PDF indicating the development site had an asking price of $3.9 million. No completion date has been announced.

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Posted in 75 Ralph Avenue | Architecture | Bedford Stuyvesant | Brooklyn | Charles Mallea Architect | New York | Residential

Revealed: SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Plans for the first phase of the Richard Meier-designed Teachers Village in Newark have been closing in on completion, but it appears that something slightly larger is on the horizon, in the form of SoMA Newark. RBH Group, which is the firm behind the Meier project, has posted new renderings of their greater plan, and — assuming the scheme is actually built — the collective change will result in the complete rebirth of the city.

While Teacher’s Village will likely result in positive changes for the surrounding neighborhood, the up-swing in Newark is clearly just beginning. Bringing Richard Meier into the project could have an avalanche of positive benefits, and the starchitect’s brand should provide the necessary pull to begin attracting additional young professionals back to the city.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark’s residential district, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Per RBH’s page on the project, the group working on the scheme includes “Richard Meier & Partners Architects, LLP, landscape architect Field Operations, engineers ARUP USA, Inc., and LEED consultant Viridian Energy & Environmental, LLC,” as well as others that joined “as the concept matured and the first phase development known as Teachers Village emerged.”

Clearly, RBH has a comprehensive team working on its vision for Newark, and the quality of the new renderings — as well as Richard Meier’s involvement — gives credence to the idea that a massive transformation for the city is on the near-horizon. Indeed, RBH has acquired 79 different parcels encompassing 23 acres, which have collective development rights of over fifteen million square feet.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark in 2025, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Converting Newark into a ‘Living Downtown’ is an equally important part of RBH Group’s vision for the city, with the SoMA plan bringing a significant amount of mixed-use space to the neighborhood, which will truly re-activate the old Downtown. Per renderings, the enormous office buildings are clearly the most obvious aspect of the plan, but the amount of residential space will also be significant, resulting in an active and vibrant streetscape.

Newark has a tremendous amount of potential and promise, and its recent revitalization is only beginning to accelerate; Teachers Village will open this year, but other major projects currently underway include new office buildings for Prudential, and a host of smaller residential developments. The Wall Street Journal recently reported on the gradual and sometimes rocky transition the city is facing, while still highlighting its upwards potential.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark’s landscape today, image from Richard Meier & Partners

The SoMA scheme would boost Newark’s vertical profile significantly, and looks to include at least one potential ‘supertall’ standing over 1,000 feet. Altogether, the plan would add three major office towers, in addition to several slender residential skyscrapers. Collectively, the high-rises could even push Downtown Newark’s height past Jersey City and Downtown Brooklyn — though the apparent goal of a 2025 completion date leaves room for alterations before all aspects are constructed.

SoMA Newark in 2015

SoMA Newark in 2015, image from Richard Meier & Partners

As prices in central locations continue to escalate into the stratosphere, the spread of development is inevitable, and pressure on New York’s peripheral nodes is finally reaching a boiling point. Imminent changes in Journal Square have so far been the best example of vertical potential, but in the near future, the growth of Newark could be even more significant. With a major airport nearby, and excellent accessibility to regional transit, the city’s renaissance is only just beginning — and as the SoMA plan illustrates, Newark may soon regain both regional and national stature.

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Posted in Architecture | Hotel | Newark | Office | RBH Group | Renderings | Residential | Richard Meier | SoMA Newark

Approved: 461 West 34th Street

461 West 34th Street today, via Google Maps

Permits have been approved for a new hotel on the corner of 34th Street and Tenth Avenue, and the filings have been accompanied by zoning diagrams, giving a preliminary look at the project’s form. The architect of record is DSM Design Group and a partnership between Atria and Marx Development is building the tower; Manhattan Regional Center’s website has additional information on the future Marriott.

The diagrams depict an average, box-like hotel, though a step-back will exist after the fourteenth floor. 461 West 34th Street will stand 312 feet in total, and its scope will span 197,253 square feet; while permits list the number of rooms at 399, the number given on MRC’s website is 385, and the development’s cost is $181.1 million. At the very least, the tower’s lower levels will be flush with both 34th Street and Tenth Avenue.

461 West 34th Street

461 West 34th Street’s zoning diagram

Regardless of the discrepancy, the building will certainly be on the larger side for new hotels in the city, though its neighbors across Tenth Avenue will certainly be far larger. The site will soon sit in the shadow of Related’s Hudson Yards development, and is also located directly across the street from the Hudson Spire site.

A report from PricewaterhouseCoopers on recent hospitality-related transactions gives a 2016 completion date for the project, which will house a Courtyard by Marriott. If 461 West 34th Street’s cousin at 307 West 37th Street is any indication of the brand’s preferred Midtown West flavor, the building’s ultimate design may end up less than stellar — but given the imminently-attractive location, plans will hopefully be geared toward an appropriate facade.

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Posted in 461 West 34th Street | Architecture | DSM Design Group | Hotel | Marriott | Marx Development | New York

In Contract: The Hudson Spire Site

Hudson Spire + The Hudson Yards -- image originally from Related

Following The New York Post’s report that Tishman Speyer expressed interest in the site of the conceptual Hudson Spire, Massey Knakal’s page on the listing has just been updated; the lot is now in-contract, indicating a buyer has been found.

Per the Post’s scoop, it would seem likely that Tishman Speyer has indeed acquired the Hudson Spire site; what’s most interesting about Tishman’s involvement is their apparent desire to acquire Sherwood’s adjacent parcel, as well. Combined, the assemblage could support a tower of approximately 2.5 million square feet, making it one of the largest buildings in New York City.

Tishman Speyer’s involvement with the Hudson Spire is particularly intriguing given the firm’s recent history with the Hudson Yards; Speyer actually won the original bidding process for the railyards, before the deal collapsed and Related was awarded the project. The old concept renderings for Tishman’s railyards vision come from Montroy Andersen DeMarco.

Tishman Speyer's Hudson Yards

Tishman Speyer’s Hudson Yards vision, image from Montroy Andersen DeMarco

Given the failed Tishman proposal for the Hudson Yards, the firm’s acquisition of Hudson Spire makes sense, and could result in an ultimate one-upping of Related, as the air rights available are enormous. With egos at play, anything is possible — and when it comes to profitability, which is the ultimate motivator for any developer, building tall in today’s market provides the most lucrative results.

In the context of the Hudson Yards’ recent past, the Tishman takeover of the Spire site is not surprising; while Related’s 30 Hudson Yards may become the railyards’ most notable structure, Speyer now has the option to overshadow competing developments with the neighborhood’s defining icon, especially if the resultant tower is mixed-use. 

With the demand for supertall and super-luxury residences continuing to soar, it certainly seems possible that that sour grapes could ultimately ferment into Manhattan’s tallest building. While uncertainties regarding the assemblage remain, the waiting game will soon be over.

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Posted in Architecture | Hudson Spire | Hudson Yards | Massey Knakal | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Supertall | Tishman Speyer

Revealed: Vernon Tower, 31-43 Vernon Boulevard

31-43 Vernon Boulevard, image from PACS Architecture

The first permits are up for a new building at 31-43 Vernon Boulevard in Queens, which straddles the border between Astoria and Long Island City. The site has been dubbed ‘Vernon Tower’ by PACS Architecture, which is the firm designing the project, and the site’s developer is Michael Heletz of Vernon Tower LLC.

31-43 Vernon Boulevard

31-43 Vernon Boulevard, image from PACS Architecture

31-43 Vernon Boulevard is located directly off of Astoria’s Socrates Sculpture Park, and the development will have unobstructed views of the Manhattan skyline; while the location may be less than prime, the vicinity is quickly becoming a hot-spot for construction. At the very least, the views offered from Vernon Tower will be comprehensive and permanent.

Aesthetically, 31-43 Vernon Boulevard falls into the ‘average’ category. The building’s facade will be simple, and its form will enhance a street-scape that was formerly barren; the development’s positive impact on the surrounding neighborhood is more important than its looks, and it will be a net-benefit for Astoria.

31-43 Vernon Boulevard

31-43 Vernon Boulevard, image from PACS Architecture

The DOB filings indicate the development will span 66,300 square feet in total, with 1,409 square feet to be dedicated to ground-floor retail. The remainder of the building will be residential, with 79 units spanning Vernon Tower’s six floors; the project will stand 61 feet tall. PACS’ page on the site has conflicting information on the number of apartments, noting the development will have 105 units.

31-43 Vernon Boulevard

31-43 Vernon Boulevard, via Google Maps

Construction is set to begin on 31-43 Vernon Boulevard this spring, though no completion date has been announced.

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Posted in 31-43 Vernon Boulevard | Architecture | Astoria | New York | PACS Architecture | Queens | Renderings | Residential | Vernon Tower

Permits Filed: 50 Clinton Street

50 Clinton Street, image from Isaac & Stern

The first DOB filings are up for a new project on Clinton Street; EV Grieve spotted renderings for the project last month, and the permits give the first indication that plans are now progressing. The developer is Icon Realty, and the architect of record is Isaac & Stern.

50 Clinton Street will be primarily residential, with 1,836 square feet of commercial space confined to the development’s ground floor; the remainder of the project will total 37,868 square feet, which will be divided between 37 residences. The first floor will have three apartments, with six apartments on floors two through six, and four units on the penthouse level, which will also include ‘recreation space.’

50 Clinton Street

50 Clinton Street, image from Isaac & Stern

Isaac & Stern’s design for the project is respectful of its Lower East Side surrounds, utilizing a simple brick facade and large casement windows; 50 Clinton Street will blend perfectly into the neighborhood, and its appearance will hopefully spark similar historicist-minded construction in the Lower East, where modern developments are often on the garish side of the aesthetic spectrum.

50 Clinton Street

50 Clinton Street, image from EV Grieve

While demolition would appear imminent, the LoDown NY reported that one retail tenant intends to maintain their lease, though given the latest round of permits, a buy-out would seem likely.

No completion date for the new 50 Clinton Street has been announced.

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Posted in 50 Clinton Street | Architecture | Downtown | Icon Realty | Isaac & Stern | Lower East Side | New York | Residential

Construction Update: 150 Charles Street

150 Charles Street

Work on 150 Charles Street continues to make significant headway, and the project is rapidly approaching its imminent completion date. The Witkoffs are developing the building, and COOKFOX is the architect of record.

150 Charles Street

150 Charles Street

The remains of the former warehouse on-site — which was the subject of significant NIMBY contention during the approval process, despite its derelict and useless state — have been completely absorbed into the base of the new building. 150 Charles Street has subsumed its predecessor, though the ‘loft-like’ elements of the warehouse have translated into industrial-style windows along the first few floors of the COOKFOX creation.

150 Charles Street

150 Charles Street

Super-luxury residential product — which is the category 150 Charles belongs in — will normally be aesthetically appealing no matter the location, given the target demographic typically considers the external appeal of a structure before buying within. While that is not always the case, 150 Charles would have been nice with or without the old walls of the warehouse, and keeping them appears to have been an issue of semantics.

150 Charles Street

150 Charles Street

The windows lining the first few floors of 150 Charles Street are extremely large and expansive, though the building’s average price-point of $4,000 per square foot would suggest as much. Glass continues to climb along the rest of the structure, and the dark-red brick facade is now complete; the development looks perfectly at home in its West Village surrounds.

150 Charles Street

150 Charles Street & The Richard Meier Towers

While many preservationists bemoan contemporary architecture, the contrast between Meier’s buildings and 150 Charles is a major positive for the Hudson River waterfront, and the juxtaposition speaks to the benefits of mixing attractive glass towers with masonry-clad structures. The collective mass of development heralds a bright future for the edge of the West Village, as the riverfront completes its transformation from an industrial enclave to a vibrant residential neighborhood.

150 Charles is expected to be completed in 2015; the building rises fifteen stories and 176 feet.

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Posted in 150 Charles Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Cook + Fox Architects | Downtown | New York | Residential | West Village | Witkoff Group

Revealed: 27-07 43rd Avenue

27-07 43rd Avenue

The first renderings are up for a new project at 27-07 43rd Avenue, in Long Island City’s Court Square neighborhood; the mixed-use building is being developed by LIC Place LLC — with Amir Hagani the name attached to the corporation — and Gene Kaufman is the architect of record.

27-07 43rd Avenue

27-07 43rd Avenue, equipment on-site

The on-site image is black, white, and not exactly all-encompassing, but the rendered design looks significantly more promising than Kaufman’s typical work in Manhattan. 27-07 43rd Avenue’s form is going to be straight-forward and basic — two qualities Kaufman definitely excels at — and as long as the facade isn’t garish, the final product may actually result in a positive contribution to the surrounding neighborhood.

Permits indicate the development will span 57,173 square feet, with ground floor retail to be topped by 50 residences. Floors two through nine will have six apartments each, while the penthouse level will have two units, as well as a rooftop terrace.

27-07 43rd Avenue

27-07 43rd Avenue, equipment on-site

27-07 43rd Avenue’s surrounds are currently booming; the number of projects rising in adjacent blocks is verging on prolific, and includes 42-12 28th Street, 41-21 24th Street, and 41-42 24th Street, to name a few. Court Square is quickly coalescing into a coherent neighborhood, and the surge of new residential development will transform the currently desolate street-scape into something vibrant, walkable, and attractive.

27-07 43rd Avenue

Project Description

Completion of 27-07 43rd Avenue is expected in the spring of 2016.

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Posted in 27-07 43rd Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Court Square | Kaufman | Long Island City | New York | Residential

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