Revealed: 75 First Avenue

75 First Avenue -- image via NO Architecture

The first renderings are up for an 8-story development at 75 First Avenue, in the East Village; the site’s developer is Orange Management, and the project’s designers are HTO Architects and NO Architecture.

NO Architecture’s Architizer page has additional information on the building, which apparently has to deal with byzantine fire codes; in their own words, “glass on the north facade is a gradient of glazing apertures, each floor changing the percentage of opening from low to high corresponding to more sought-after views above and more stringent fire ratings below.”

Beyond the innovative work-around of the fire codes, 75 First Avenue takes another step to minimize the appearance of mechanicals, and “roof HVAC bulkheads [will be] clad in a metal lattice framework for a vertical garden, adding desirable lushness and evaporative cooling to the roof deck.”

Integrating elements that are typically unappealing into a project’s design and turning them into beneficial attributes rather than simple afterthoughts is a hallmark of good design. The collaboration between HTO and NO appears to be promising, though 75 First Avenue is currently the subject of a stop-work order.

Permits indicate the development will span 34,055 square feet, with the bulk of the project dedicated to residential use. 8,456 square feet will be given to ground-floor retail, while the remaining 25,599 square feet will be divided between 27 units. 75 First Avenue will stand 80 feet in total.

75 First Avenue

A slightly older plan for 75 First Avenue — image via NO Architecture

Orange Management’s website gives a 2015 completion date for 75 First Avenue, and given the relatively small scope of the development, that would seem to be a likely bet.

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Posted in 75 First Avenue | Architecture | Downtown | East Village | HTO Architects | New York | NO Architecture | Orange Management | Residential

Construction Update: 218 West 35th Street

218 West 35th Street

Construction continues to make rapid progress at 218 West 35th Street, which is one of the more significant hotels to rise in Midtown Manhattan so far this decade; the project’s developer is Cayre Investments, and SRA Architecture designed the building.

Besides the tower’s topping-out, work has also continued on cladding; a rendering has finally surfaced on-site as well, giving a better look at what will be the finished product.

218 West 35th Street

218 West 35th Street

While the design is not terrible, 218 West 35th Street certainly falls on the bland side of the aesthetic spectrum. The building is set back from 35th Street, though that is hardly surprising given the predominant appearance of new hotel developments in the neighborhood. Given what could have happened, the result is inoffensive.

218 West 35th Street

218 West 35th Street

Renderings depict cladding on the upper-most floors that will actually add to the building’s character, however minimally, and it appears that there may be vague inspirations from the Art Deco period in the tower’s upper-most ‘fins,’ though whether the computer-generated images translate into reality is questionable.

 

218 West 35th Street

218 West 35th Street

Even at 40 stories and 432 feet in height, 218 West 35th Street is completely invisible on the overall skyline; completion of the 342-room development is expected in January of next year.

218 West 35th Street

218 West 35th Street

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Posted in 218 West 35th Street | Architecture | Cayre Investments | Construction Update | Hotel | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | SRA Architecture

Permits Filed: 611 Madison Avenue

611 Madison Avenue at center, image via Google Maps

The first DOB filings are up for a new building at 611 Madison Avenue, which will replace the existing 7-story townhouse. The architect of record is Fogarty Finger, while the developer appears to be the Zurich Holding Company.

Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the new permits is the fact that the future 611 Madison Avenue will have fewer floors than the current building; the replacement structure will rise six stories, and 112 feet. The height increase will be notable, and signals a shift towards higher-end retail; the entirety of the development will span 27,853 feet, with offices to be located on the top two floors.

With Fogarty Finger involved as the site’s architect, the outcome is likely to be a significant improvement from the current structure, which is a bland example of a pre-war building that also involves a seemingly forgotten rooftop component.

Fogarty Finger’s plans for the recently revealed 11-51 47th Avenue in Long Island City reveal the firm’s promising take on classic design, and it would appear likely that 611 Madison will house something similarly upscale. The location is prime, especially as the property is in the shadow of 432 Park Avenue; as 57th Street continues to evolve into a super-upscale corridor, the spillover to neighboring cross-streets is inevitable.

No completion date for 611 Madison Avenue has been announced. While permits for the existing structure’s demolition remain elusive, filings for ‘facade repairs’ were approved back in 2012, possibly as a pre-cursor to the wrecking ball.

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Posted in 611 Madison Avenue | Architecture | Fogarty Finger | Midtown | Midtown East | New York | Zurich Holding Company

Vision: VIVO on The High Line

VIVO on The High Line, image via NBRS/Metropolis Mag

Metropolis Magazine’s Living Cities competition has resulted in several interesting concepts, and yesterday, Curbed reported on AMLGM’s scheme for a mass of tubular towers over Queens. Another winning entry from the competition is NBRS + Partners’ vision for a development along The High Line, situated on the site now occupied by Related’s 500 West 30th Street.

VIVO on The High Line

VIVO on The High Line, image via NBRS/Metropolis Mag

NBRS’ page on the project gives a detailed overview of the intentions and ideas behind the structure’s design. Perhaps the most important take-away is the building’s versatility, as the ”expressive steel structure solution permits agility,” which “allows for flexible internal space planning, future proofing the base building against the pressures of demography, market and demand.”

Introducing the concept of ‘future-proofing’ is especially pertinent to the renewed debate regarding landmarking in Manhattan, as the vast majority of the city’s current building stock was not built with the distant future in mind, which is resulting in a myriad of issues across the region.

VIVO on The High Line

VIVO on The High Line, image via NBRS/Metropolis Mag

Designing structures that are meant to last forever should be considered and encouraged, as the vast majority of New York’s current stock was built for profit, not permanence. VIVO hits on this idea with the versatility of the tower’s exoskeleton, as the interiors can be transformed to accommodate any number of uses.

Besides the adaptability of NBRS’ vision, the building would also integrate The High Line, presenting an idea that has been touched upon but never fully embraced by developments adjacent to the park. Related’s towers at the Hudson Yards represent a step forward — with The High Line set to become an integral aspect of 10 Hudson Yards‘ lobby — but VIVO takes the park to the next level, pushing its ”vitality vertically to reach the New York skyline some 40 stories above.”

VIVO on The High Line

VIVO on The High Line, image via NBRS/Metropolis Mag

The vision for VIVO offers a forward-thinking take on vertical living that will hopefully be emulated in other sites, adjacent to The High Line or otherwise — and while 500 West 30th Street is now home to the Robert A.M. Stern-designed ‘Abington,’ opportunities for projects that truly push the envelope along The High Line remain.

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Posted in Architecture | NBRS + Partners | New York | Renderings | Residential | VIVO on The High Line

Permits Filed: 12 West 55th Street

12-18 West 55th Street today, via Google Maps

The first permits are up for a new development at 12 West 55th Street, though if recent news is any indication, the DOB filings do not tell the whole story. Curbed recently reported on rejected permits filed last year, and The New York Post covered the site back in 2009, when JD Carlisle acquired the site from Lincoln Properties. Perkins Eastman is now the architect of record, with Cornerstone Advisers representing ’12-18 West 55th Street Pre-Development,’ which is likely an alias for JD Carlisle.

Yesterday’s filings indicate that 12 West 55th Street will soon stand six stories tall, with an interior spanning 27,204 square feet. The entirety of the project will be residential, with four residences in total; simple math gives an average unit size of nearly 7,000 square feet, which would be enormous.

As Curbed and the Post previously reported, Carlisle has amassed a relatively large assemblage, with air rights totaling over 100,000 square feet; the previous plan for the site indicated a 55-unit and 22-story building would rise in place of the current townhomes.

It would seem that the most recent DOB documents are missing a large portion of the site’s available FAR rights. Given the assemblage spans from 12-18 West 55th Street, additional filings at another address appear to be likely. Regardless of semantics, Perkins Eastman’s involvement is a positive sign for the future building’s appearance, and if the current filings do come to fruition, units averaging nearly 7,000 square feet will command a top-notch design.

No completion date for the project has been announced.

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Posted in 12 West 55th Street | Architecture | JD Carlisle | Midtown | New York | Residential

Revealed: 433 First Avenue

433 First Avenue, image via KPF

Renderings have been posted for NYU’s new facility at 433 First Avenue; the building will soon be home to both the NYU College of Nursing, and a portion of the University’s College of Dentistry. Per DOB filings, the architect of record is EYP, though KPF appears to have led the project’s design.

433 First Avenue

433 First Avenue, image via KPF

NYU’s page on the site indicates the new building will span 170,000 square feet, which permits corroborate; the structure will stand eleven stories and 162 feet tall, allowing generous ceiling heights.

433 First Avenue

433 First Avenue, image via KPF

Aesthetically, 433 First Avenue will be a boon to the surrounding neighborhood, which has long been a warren of architectural neglect. The vicinity is dominated by dated towers and decrepit pre-war buildings, and the contrast presented by KPF’s creation will be a refreshing break from the developments that typify Kips Bay, which is a relative no-man’s-land, wedged between Midtown and Peter Cooper Village.

433 First Avenue

433 First Avenue, image via KPF

433 First Avenue’s facade will be glass and terra cotta, offering another example of the historic material’s recent comeback in New York City, where its usage is gaining significant visibility — perhaps most prominently at SHoP’s future 111 West 57th Street.

433 First Avenue

433 First Avenue, image via KPF

Besides integrating classic materials, the scheme for 433 First Avenue is decidedly contemporary, which is an obvious necessity given NYU’s position as a leading global academic institution. Large windows will allow ample light, and cut-outs will add variety and depth to the facade; the influx of additional students will also benefit the neighborhood’s pedestrian scene.

433 First Avenue

Construction progress

Completion of 433 First Avenue is expected later this year.

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Posted in 433 First Avenue | Architecture | Kips Bay | Kohn Pederson Fox | Midtown | New York | NYU

Permits Filed: 802 Myrtle Avenue

802 Myrtle Avenue Aerial, via Google Earth

The first permits are up for 802 Myrtle Avenue in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, which ‘Bright Villas LLC’ is developing. While the actual developer is unknown, the DOB filings come one day after permits were issued for 75 Ralph Avenue — also in Bed-Stuy,  – and both projects feature Charles Mallea as the architect of record, which may or may not be a simple coincidence.

802 Myrtle Avenue

802 Myrtle Avenue via Google Maps

The filings indicate that 802 Myrtle Avenue will span 31,201 square feet, with a 76 square foot commercial component to be located in the project’s cellar, giving it the smallest claim to ‘mixed-use’ possible. The remainder of the building will have 46 residences, spanning eight stories; the structure will stand 94 feet in total, and ceiling heights will be surprisingly generous compared to typical new developments in the neighborhood.

While much of Bedford-Stuyvesant is dominated by pre-war architecture, the vicinity of 802 Myrtle Avenue was decimated during the time of Robert Moses, and the Marcy Houses are located directly across the street. Positive changes are gradually occurring across the entire neighborhood, and developments like 802 Myrtle will go a long ways towards bettering the area’s reputation, which has typically revolved around the negative press surrounding its public housing.

Regardless of the potential design for 802 Myrtle, its effect will be a major positive for a block that has been on the outs until recently. Politicians may lack the motivation to fix systemic issues that plague the neighborhood, but if Bed-Stuy is to regain a sense of its pre-Moses vitality, piecemeal development is definitely a good start.

No completion date for 802 Myrtle has been announced.

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Posted in 802 Myrtle Avenue | Architecture | New York | Residential

Construction Update: 560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street

Construction is making headway at 560 West 24th Street — aka the NY Art Residences — which Tavros Capital is developing. The architect of record is Montroy Andersen DeMarco. While on-site signage indicates the address is 560 West 24th, permits are actually filed under a different bin — separate from the Sky Garage — at 552 West 24th Street.

560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street — image from the official website

Renderings were posted with the signage, and the concept is promising; 560 West 24th Street is the second structure on its block to offer a contemporary take on classic design, though the final product at the Tavros site — clad in limestone — will be a significant departure from its cast-concrete cousin at 508 West 24th Street. Despite the difference in facades, both sites will appeal to a similar ultra-high-end buyer, and Curbed posted an in-depth look inside the NY Art Residences following the sales launch.

560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street will have eight units in total, with residences averaging over 3,500 square feet apiece. The ground floor will have an art gallery, with each floor above housing a single condominium; there will be two duplexes atop the structure, and its roof will stand 137 feet above the street. With eleven stories in total, ceiling heights will be generous, and floor-plans will be more than spacious.

560 West 24th Street

560 West 24th Street

The Art Residences will continue the trend towards super-luxury development in the lower West 20s, where starchitect brands have been yielding to subtle yet equally appealing creations by lesser-known architects. Completion is expected this November.

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Posted in 560 West 24th Street | Architecture | Chelsea | Construction Update | Midtown | Montroy Andersen DeMarco | New York | NY Art Residences | Residential | Tavros Capital

Revealed: 959 First Avenue

959 First Avenue rendering

The first renderings for 959 First Avenue have been posted on-site, giving a detailed look at Toll Brothers City Living’s latest project to begin construction in Manhattan; Incorporated NY is the design architect, while Goldstein Hill & West is the architectural firm of record, per filings with the Department of Buildings.

Permits indicate the mixed-use structure will have 197,127 square feet in total, and 9,569 square feet will be dedicated to ground floor retail. The remainder of the project will be divided between 114 residences, and the 30-story building’s pinnacle will stand 333 feet above the street.

959 First Avenue

Foundation work

959 First Avenue’s design will benefit the neighborhood, which has long existed in architectural limbo on the periphery of Midtown. With much of the existing pre-war stock run-down, the area’s modernization and continued development is a definite boon, and the plans for Toll Brothers’ building will both respect the site’s surrounds and add to its urban dynamic.

959 First Avenue

959 First Avenue, site overview

While Goldstein Hill & West tend towards the modern end of design, the firm’s scheme for 959 First Avenue definitely has historicist elements, with casement windows featuring prominently; the concept almost looks like a residential take on the McGraw Hill Building in Midtown West, minus the green facade. 959 First Avenue’s aesthetics will add to the neighborhood, and the project will also enhance the street-wall along First Avenue, providing new retail space that will enliven the pedestrian sphere.

959 First Avenue

959 First Avenue

Per on-site signage, completion of 959 First Avenue is expected in the fall of 2016.

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Posted in 959 First Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Goldstein Hill West | Midtown | Midtown East | New York | Residential | Toll Brothers

Permits Filed: 75 Ralph Avenue

75 Ralph Avenue -- via Google Maps

The first DOB filings are up for a six-story residential development at 75 Ralph Avenue, in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood; the developer is Solomon Feder of 75 Ralph LLC, and the architect is Charles Mallea. An existing laundromat on-site will be demolished to make way for the new structure, with permits for its demise issued late last month.

75 Ralph Avenue

75 Ralph Avenue — via Google Maps

While Mallea’s site lacks renderings of 75 Ralph Avenue, Curbed has a reveal of another development the architect is involved with, at 482 Seneca Avenue in Ridgewood. If that project is any indication, Mallea’s Bed-Stuy building may tend towards a bland-contemporary aesthetic.

Bed-Stuy is home to an extensive amount of pre-war architecture, and something at 75 Ralph Avenue that considers the neighborhood context would be ideal, if unlikely. Regardless of the design, a nearly-vacant lot will still be transformed into much-needed housing, resulting in a net-positive for the surrounding area.

Permits indicate that 75 Ralph Avenue will measure 38,462 square feet, and the entirety of the structure will be residential; the building will be split between 57 units, and it will stand 69 feet tall.

Massey Knakal has a PDF indicating the development site had an asking price of $3.9 million. No completion date has been announced.

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Posted in 75 Ralph Avenue | Architecture | Bedford Stuyvesant | Brooklyn | Charles Mallea Architect | New York | Residential

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