Revealed: 253 8th Street, New Two-Family Park Slope Home

253 8th Street, image by Atelier Architecture

Back in December, renovation permits were approved for the existing structure at 253 8th Street, in Brooklyn’s Park Slope. YIMBY now has the reveal for the project, which has been designed by Atelier New York Architecture, and is being developed by Josh Egendorf of 8th Street Residence LLC.

Atelier’s website describes the project thusly:

[253 8th Street is a] two-family development in Park Slope consisting of an expansive three-bedroom vertical home and an additional one-bedroom rental unit. Floor-to-ceiling windows overlook three levels of outdoor balconies and terraces in the owner’s residence, creating an unusual level of connection between the outdoors and the life of the occupants inside.

The old structure was a dowdy building that traded hands to the current developer for $1.36 million back in April of 2013. It was re-listed for $3.2 million last year with the new plans attached before being withdrawn from the market, per Streeteasy.

253 Eighth Street

253 8th Street, image by Atelier Architecture

The dramatic increase in the expected price-tag is the result of the total transformation, and the renovation and expansion will increase the building’s size from 2,811 square feet to 3,896 square feet.

Atelier’s plan is an especially dramatic improvement when compared to the architecture of neighboring structures, a mish-mash of buildings both old and new, none possessing character worthy of preservation.

253 8th Street

253 8th Street, old structure at center, from Google Maps

Given proximity to the F, G, and R subway lines, all located just one block west, it is nonsensical that zoning does not allow for denser housing, and the blocks surrounding 253 8th Street should be prime candidates for additional residential density. Under-utilized infrastructure should be the first consideration when planning for more housing, but the built fabric is also important. And the area surrounding 253 8th Street, like many others in New York City, lacks any built fabric that is truly historic, and could easily be transformed into a denser neighborhood that meets the city’s extremely pent-up residential demand.

The western edge of 253 8th Street’s block abuts Fourth Avenue, and even the construction boom around that corridor is composed of projects with relatively limited scope, despite nearby transit options. While buildings like the ODA-designed 275 Fourth Avenue will certainly be attractive, even their aggregate will do little to address demand that shows no signs of satiation.

Building two-family homes only one block from three different subway lines is an excellent example of New York’s “city planning” in action, and illustrates why today’s high prices are a result of bad policy, rather than overdevelopment. Even so, the undersized expansion of 253 8th Street will be a positive addition to the neighborhood. While no completion date has been formally announced, the approval of permits is a sign that work will hopefully begin shortly.

Talk about this project on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 253 8th Street | Architecture | Atelier Architecture | Brooklyn | Josh Egendorf | New York | Residential

Permits Filed: 241 Franklin Avenue, Bed-Stuy

241 Franklin Avenue, image from Google Maps

In the face of gentrification, no group in Brooklyn can withstand the onslaught, whether it’s Poles in Greenpoint, African-Americans in Bed-Stuy, Italians in East Williamsburg, Mexicans in Sunset Park, West Indians in Flatbush, or even the early gentrifying hipsters being displaced by full-blown yuppies in Northside Williamsburg.

No group, that is, except one: Hasidic Jews. While the neighborhoods around South Williamsburg have been completely enveloped by at least the incipient stages of gentrification, the Satmar Hasidim have managed to actually expand their territory to the south and east.

One example is a new building for which a permit application was filed yesterday, at 241 Franklin Avenue, between DeKalb and Willoughby avenues, in the increasingly Hasidic northwestern corner of Bed-Stuy.

There, just a few blocks from the G train, a five-story, four-unit residential building is set to rise, according to the filing. With 6,735 square feet of floorspace, the apartments will have a very frum family-friendly average size of nearly 1,700 square feet.

The developers – listed as Shimshon Baum and Shulem Lowy – picked up the vacant lot last year from its longtime owner for just $200,000, or a bargain basement $30 per buildable square foot. The architect is listed as Sandor Weiss with Gelu Durus Musica.

Based on sales in comparable building, if the apartments are sold as condos, they should go for not much more than $400 per square foot each, or less than $700,000 – about the price of a one-bedroom in the non-Hasidic areas to the north and south.

Talk about this project on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 241 Franklin Avenue | Architecture | Bedford Stuyvesant | Brooklyn | Gelu Durus Musica | New York | Residential | Shimshon Baum | Shulem Lowy

Permits Filed for Conversion of 180 Water Street Into 601-Unit Apartment Building, Financial District

180 Water Street, image by Nicholas Strini with PropertyShark

In 2013, Emmes Realty paid $151 million (or $330 per square foot) to acquire the 25-story black modernist tower, built in 1971, at 180 Water Street, on the east side of the Financial District.

Now, the owner is seeking to continue a decades-long trend towards housing in the Financial District, with a filing with the Department of Buildings today to convert the tower into 601 apartments, likely rentals. The conversion comes just as 180 Water is about to lose its sole tenant, the city’s Human Resources Administration, to 4 World Trade Center.

The application, submitted by Avinash K. Malhotra Architects, calls for converting all but 10,500 square feet of the building’s 457,000 square feet of usable space into apartments. The first floor would have retail space, but aside from that, the entire tower would be residential, with 20 apartments per floor.

While the overall square footage would remain constant – in fact, it would fall by 411 square feet – the building would rise from 25 stories to 32, from 345 feet to 395. (Although, oddly enough, the Schedule A filing suggests that there would be a lounge and leasing offices on the 28th floor, a recreation room on the 29th, a pool and deck on the roof, but with no mention of floors 30 through 32.)

The conversion also unwittingly illustrates the absurdity of New York State’s housing density cap, which limits new construction to a residential floor area ratio of twelve. The rule does not apply to conversions downtown – a seeming logical inconsistency, given that purpose-built apartment buildings are likely to be better designed for residential tenants than converted office blocks – and indeed this building would, after conversion, have a residential density of nearly 19, with 446,000 square feet of housing piled atop the 24,000-square foot lot.

Emmes also acquired neighboring 160 Water Street for $165 million, but no alteration permits have been filed there.

Talk about this project on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 180 Water Street | Avinash Malhotra | Emmes Realty | Financial District | Manhattan

YIMBY Today: Essex Capital Begins Construction on 16-14 Madison Street in Ridgewood, More

16-14 Madison Street, rendering via Essex Capital

16-14 Madison Street [Crain's Business]: Essex Capital “has begun construction” of their eight-story, 90-unit residential building to span 16-14 – 16-26 Madison Street, in Ridgewood. KSQ Architects is designing, and completion is expected in Summer of 2016.

187 Lenox Avenue

187 Lenox Avenue, rendering by Desbrisay & Smith Architects

187 Lenox Avenue [Daily News]: Weissman Equities is planning a $400,000 renovation of the existing five-story brownstone at 187 Lenox Avenue, in Harlem. The building will include five residential units and “a 900 square-foot ground-floor eatery,” and completion is expected this spring.

856 Washington Avenue [Brownstoner]: Slate Property Group has acquired the low-rise, 6,000 square-foot Greenpoint Savings Bank — located at 856 Washington Avenue, in Prospect heights — for $6.5 million. The site has 40,000 square feet of building potential, but plans have yet to be revealed.

785 Dekalb Avenue

785 Dekalb Avenue, rendering by Durukan Design

785 Dekalb Avenue [Curbed]: SSJ Development’s six-story, 70-unit residential building — currently topped-out at 785 Dekalb Avenue, in northern Bedford-Stuyvesant — is now being redesigned by Durukan Design. The façade will be made of “brick with metal cladding,” and completion is expected later this year.

212 5th Avenue [Commercial Observer]: Thor Equities, Madison Equities, and Building and Land Technology “have closed on the $260 million purchase” of 212 5th Avenue, in NoMad. The 21-story, 220,000 square-foot building will undergo a conversion to 48 condo units.

15 Lafayette Avenue

15 Lafayette Avenue, rendering via Jonathan Rose Companies

15 Lafayette Avenue [Daily News]: Jonathan Rose Companies is set to acquire the development site at 15 Lafayette Avenue, in Fort Greene, to build a 12-story, 123-unit mixed-income and mixed-use building. Construction “begins this Spring” and “is expected to be completed by [late] 2016.”

Talk about these projects on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 15 Lafayette Avenue | 16-14 Madison Street | 16-26 Madison Street | 187 Lenox Avenue | 212 5th Avenue | 785 Dekalb Avenue | 856 Washington Avenue

DOB Digest: Issac & Stern Designing Eight-Story Building at 1535 Bedford in Crown Heights, More

Pre-demolition 1527-1535 Bedford Avenue, image via Google Maps (Oct. 2013)

BROOKLYN:

1535 Bedford Avenue: Adam America has filed applications for an eight-story, 133-unit mixed-use residential and retail building measuring 106,000 square feet to span 1527-1535 Bedford Avenue, in eastern Crown Heights. Issac & Stern Architects is designing, and an existing gas station must first be removed.

QUEENS:

108-18 Roosevelt Avenue: Applications have been filed for a two-story, 20,000 square-foot commercial building spanning four separate lots at 108-18 Roosevelt Avenue, in North Corona. Multiple conjoined two-story structures must first be demolished.

Talk about these projects on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 108-18 Roosevelt Avenue | 1535 Bedford Avenue

Permits Filed: 35 Hudson Yards, 1,009-Foot Office/Hotel/Condo Tower

Latest version at 55 Hudson Yards, rendering by Kohn Pedersen Fox -- 35 HY at left

A new building permit application was filed this morning for 35 Hudson Yards, the Related/Oxford Properties-developed mixed-use tower set to rise at the southeastern corner of 33rd Street and 11th Avenue, a block south of the new 7 train terminus, near where Hudson Boulevard meets the public square below 33rd Street, with a legal street address of 532-560 West 33rd Street. According to the Schedule A filing, there would be six stories of office space, 217 hotel rooms (up from the 175 previously disclosed), and 135 condominium apartments.

The 1,000-foot-tall, 79-story tower has morphed into a 1,009-foot, 72-story one, per the filing, with a bit over 1 million square feet of total construction area, including common space and mechanicals that do not count towards zoning. The square footage for zoning purposes is, oddly, not listed, but the Schedule A filing provides some clues about the space breakdown.

The first floor would be consumed by lobbies, with retail on the second, fourth, and fifth. Six floors of office space – hitherto unannounced – would start on the eighth floor, with the hotel portion stretching from the 19th to the 29th (20 rooms per floor, except for the 27th which would have 17).

35 Hudson Yards

35 Hudson Yards, image from Related

The apartments – condos, Related’s said in the past – would start on the 31st floor, with five each up to the 40th, four each from the 41st through 50th, three each from the 51st through the 60th, two each from the 61st through the 67th, and three full-floor penthouse units up through the 70th. Mechanical space or accessory office space would fill in the gaps, as well as the 71st floor.

The cylindrical tower would be designed by David Childs with SOM, and no groundbreaking date is set.

Talk about this project on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 35 Hudson Yards | David Childs | Manhattan | Related | SOM

Work Halted at Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 1 Over Height Questions

Pier 1 development, project in question on the right, image from Brooklyn Bridge Park

Early in Bloomberg’s term as mayor, a deal was struck to give Brooklyn Heights a new park. Rather than fund it out of the general budget – which might have been seen as unfair to neighborhoods in the city without as much investment and wealth – the plan was to build housing on the edge of the park, which would then pay for the waterfront greensward (whose land the Port Authority was planning to sell to private developers anyway) without diverting funds from projects in other more deserving neighborhoods.

That logic has been forgotten by many, who decry the construction of housing on the edge of what has become Brooklyn Bridge Park. And now they are doing what they can to halt the projects, which luckily is not much, given de Blasio’s support for the plan.

Among other points, opponents have opined against the minuscule bump in the height and placement of mechanicals on the roof of the northern building (which recently topped out), designed by Marvel Architects. The southern building, on the other hand, will stand 55 feet tall, the result of a very minor 3.55-foot height increase.

But now, at the request of Brooklyn Bridge Park, the developer of the southern building on Pier 1 – a joint venture between Starwood Capital and Toll Brothers City Living – is looking to the city’s Department of Buildings to confirm that the height change is in compliance with the Brooklyn Heights Scenic View District, which limits the height of buildings between the Brooklyn Heights Promenade and the waterfront to protect the views of the Lower Manhattan skyline, Governors Island, the Statue of Liberty and the Brooklyn Bridge.

To that end, the DOB has issued a partial stop work order on the southern building (halting work on and above the second floor slab), which lies within the protected view plan, while the developer checks with the department to make sure the plans comply with the scenic view zoning.

“Minor adjustments such as the alteration of bulkheads or parapets are among the type of alterations that may be necessary to bring the structure into full compliance,” according to a Brooklyn Bridge Park official.

“We take our responsibility to protect the Scenic View District very seriously,” Regina Myer, president of Brooklyn Bridge Park, told YIMBY, “and we will take aggressive action against any encroachment on the protected view plane.”

A DOB decision will hopefully be coming shortly, so that work can resume on bringing more apartments to this desperately supply-constrained city.

Talk about this project on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Brooklyn | Brooklyn Bridge Park | Brooklyn Heights | Marvel Architects | New York | Residential | Starwood Capital | Toll Brothers

First Look: Williamsurg Apple Store, 247 Bedford Avenue

247 Bedford Avenue from the east, image by Marin Architects

In December, the New York Post’s Steve Cuozzo revealed the location of Apple’s first store in Williamsburg: 247 Bedford Avenue, on the corner of North 3rd Street, just a few blocks from the L stop.

And now, YIMBY’s come across a rendering of the renovation now underway, though it appears to have been done before Apple was chosen as a tenant, so some design changes are likely.

247 Bedford Avenue from the west, image by Marin Architects

247 Bedford Avenue from the west, image by Marin Architects

The existing structure at 247 Bedford has a bit of character but is woefully inadequate for a tenant like Apple – the ceiling heights don’t match up, some of the brick has been covered with a green material, and the building lacks central air, with window units and through-wall units puncturing the façade.

The renovation as rendered would maintain and expand the brick, and install handsome new casement windows. We do, however, believe that the design as depicted is not the final one, since Cuozzo’s column mentions “dramatic, arched windows,” reminiscent of the ones currently in place on the Bedford Avenue frontage, but which do not appear in the rendering.

247 Bedford is notable in that it breaks a cardinal rule of New York City zoning and real estate: nearly everything that’s allowed to be residential will be, at least above the first floor. The popularity of Bedford Avenue as a retail corridor was apparently enough to induce the property owners – Red Sky Capital and Waterbridge – to remove the apartments on the second and third stories, and replace them with retail space.

The renovation is set to wrap up in April of this year.

Talk about this project on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 247 Bedford Avenue | Apple | Architecture | Brooklyn | Marin Architects | New York | Red Sky Capital | Waterbridge

Construction Update: 30 Park Place Nears Topping-Out

30 Park Place

Downtown’s new tallest residential building was ceremoniously topped-out last week, and 30 Park Place certainly holds its own on the New York skyline. Per DOB permits, the skyscraper will stand 937 feet tall, totaling 67 floors (almost all of which are now up). Silverstein is developing, and the building will house a Four Seasons Hotel & Residences, with lower levels holding 185 hotel rooms and upper floors housing 157 condominiums

30 Park Place

30 Park Place, along with 19 Park Place & the Woolworth Building

Even the mid-levels of 30 Park Place have generally comprehensive views, with the highest floors towering above the formerly-dominant Woolworth Building. That skyscraper, which stood as the world’s tallest from 1913 to 1930, remains distinctive, and should serve as a reminder that buildings like the Chrysler and Empire State will maintain their individuality and dignity even if they are soon surrounded by supertalls (as will be the case for both icons).

While changes to the skyline remain as contentious as ever, cladding the new buildings in limestone (or concrete made to look like limestone like 30 Park Place has) is definitely a way to ensure they mesh relatively seamlessly, and in this regard, the future Four Seasons Hotel & Residences excels. Once the full exterior is complete, it should appear as just another tower on the Lower Manhattan skyline, not particularly distinctive, but nonetheless attractive (in contrast to its showier rival, 56 Leonard).

30 Park Place

30 Park Place already blending into the background

The building is among a trio of Robert A.M. Stern-designed towers under construction, with the others underway at 220 Central Park South (which will be the tallest of the group, at 950′), and 520 Park Avenue (around 800′). All three developments will rank among the tallest residential buildings in New York City, though prices at the Uptown projects will be significantly higher than at 30 Park Place.

Completion is expected in mid 2016, and while the facade continues its rise, window installation has also recently begun.

Talk about 30 Park Place on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 30 Park Place | 99 Church | Architecture | Construction Update | Downtown | FiDi | Financial District | New York | Residential | Robert Stern Architects | Silverstein

Jamaica Colosseum Mall for Sale, Asking $45 Million: 89-02 165th Street

Jamaica Colosseum Mall, image from UrbLife

If you’re looking to put your mark on downtown Jamaica, your time might be now: Epic Commercial Real Estate (once known as Itzhaki Properties) is marketing a large, nearly 50,000-square foot piece of land at 89-02 165th Street, home to the Jamaica Colosseum Mall.

Opened as a Macy’s in 1947 and turned into the Colosseum Mall in the ’80s, the building currently houses a large jewelry exchange and parking garage, but has deteriorated to the point where the most likely use for the property is as a development site.

Fronting on the 165th Street pedestrian mall, 89th Avenue, and 164th Street, the site is a block from Hillside Avenue, in an area “riddled by high foot and auto traffic,” per the listing.

With nearly 250,000 square feet of development rights – commercial or residential – the price the owner wants for the property is not cheap. Asking $45 million, or $180 per buildable square foot, the price would far exceed that of other sites in the area, and would not have been out of the ordinary on Fourth Avenue in Park Slope a few years ago.

In October, a Flushing-based developer paid $22 million for an Archer Avenue parcel with 720,000 square feet of development rights, or just $30 a foot. In December, CPEX was marketing a site with 420,000 square feet of development rights with an asking price of $24 million, or bit under $60 a foot.

At three times the price of the latter site, the $160-a-foot asking price of the Queens Colosseum site partly reflects the existing structure on the site (the mall is still operational, albeit a bit faded since the days when LL Cool J and the Wu-Tang Clan filmed rap videos there), partly reflects the seller’s hubris, but also partly reflects the real estate industry’s growing confidence in downtown Jamaica – a neighborhood once left for dead, but since reinvigorated with a growing South Asian and Central American immigrant population.

Talk about this project on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 89-02 165th Street | Epic Commercial Real Estate | Jamaica | Jamaica Colosseum Mall | New York | Queens

YIMBY News

You have been reading YIMBY for 60 seconds.

That’s all the time it takes to read our Saturday newsletter, which summarizes the week’s Top 5 stories.

To subscribe, please enter your email in the box below.

Close