Permits Filed: 1 Manhattan West Will Stand 995 Feet Tall

Manhattan West, image from Brookfield

While specifics surrounding the platform covering the former pit under Brookfield’s Manhattan West are exquisitely explained in various informational videos, details regarding the actual office towers have been harder to come by. Now, per a new building permit filed at the DOB, YIMBY can bring the latest word on 401 Ninth Avenue, which — at just a hair over 300 meters — will officially rank as a supertall.

The 69-story building will stand 995 feet to its pinnacle, with interiors spanning 1,644,660 square feet. While the total size is not surprising, the floor-count is roughly the same as the shorter residential tower that will rise around the corner. The height discrepancy comes from the larger ceilings for the office tower, which will house Class-A space.

SOM is designing all of the site’s buildings, and Brookfield has chosen a restrained aesthetic for its mega-development, apparently ignoring the more daring designs coming to Related’s Hudson Yards, which will feature several architects working in sync. While the streamlined appearance of Manhattan West will not be bad, the site’s basic massing will keep its profile on the skyline relatively low.

At 995 feet, 1 Manhattan West will still rank as one of the tallest buildings in New York City, standing just ten feet shy of One57, or roughly two dozen feet above 150 Greenwich Street. If it weren’t for the multiple projects of over 1,000 feet rising just to the west, Brookfield’s site would become the visual anchor for the Far West Side, but instead, its towers will be reduced to relative filler.

While construction on Manhattan West’s residential tower is imminent, anchor tenants must be secured before the office components can rise, and so far, none have been confirmed.

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Posted in 1 Manhattan West | Architecture | Brookfield | Manhattan West | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Office | SOM | Supertall

Revealed: 715 Soundview Avenue & 880 Tinton Avenue, Bronx

715 Soundview Avenue, photo from UAI

Last week, we featured a rendering of a South Bronx affordable housing project by Urban Architectural Initiatives, which caught our eye with its clean and colorful façade.

This week, we have two recently finished projects by the same architectural practice, which focuses on affordable housing and other buildings for non-profit and government clients. The two supportive housing structures were designed for Odyssey House, with the help of the New York State Office of Mental Health.

One is a five-story and 56-unit building at 715 Soundview Avenue, in the Soundview section of the East Bronx, and the other is a 65-unit project at 880 Tinton Avenue, in the South Bronx. Both designs feature colorful façades, and stand out among the boring brick boxes that normally characterize non-profit housing development in New York City.

880 Tinton Avenue, photo from UAI

880 Tinton Avenue, photo from UAI

The architects described the Soundview building thusly on their website:

It is located on an unusual triangular site in the Bronx, which challenged UAI to create a dynamic building, clad in a glass-fiber reinforced rain-screen system. A transparent glass façade at the corner entry and lounges on each of the elevator lobbies above contrasts with the paneled face of the residential portions of the building. A third material, painted metal panels, are a symbolic gesture to the mechanical distribution system behind, and serve as an additional colored element in the ensemble of façade materials.

The punched windows at the apartments are designed to take advantage of the shape of the building and direction of the wind and maximize natural ventilation in the apartments. The common spaces including dining, exercise, laundry, and lounge spaces in the cellar open onto a rear yard which terrace up through many levels of urban vegetable gardens until reaching the lobby entry level. Many active and passive energy conservation features are incorporated in the design of the building. This is Odyssey’s first building with LEED certification.

We would be remiss if we didn’t mention the refreshing lack of PTAC units marring the façades of both buildings, as with their Morissania counterpart. We have yet to come across a firm that’s been winning the war on through-wall air conditioning as handily as UAI, all the more impressive since their clients are non-profits, with less leeway in terms of construction costs.

The Soundview Avenue building opened last December, and the Tinton Avenue site was finished this past October.

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Posted in 715 Soundview Avenue | 880 Tinton Avenue | Architecture | Bronx | East Bronx | New York | Odyssey House | Residential | Urban Architectural Initiatives

Yet Another Ravenswood Hotel: Permits Filed at 38-42 11th Street, Long Island City

Vacant lot at 38-42 11th Street, via Google Maps

It’s becoming increasingly difficult to come up with original ledes for posts about new hotels in Ravenswood, as the little-known industrial neighborhood wedged between Long Island City and Astoria bursts at the seams with new budget lodgings. Today, filings went up for another hotel, coming to 38-42 11th Street, mid-block between 38th and 40th Avenues, located directly north of the Queensbridge Houses NYCHA project.

According to the permit application, the new structure would rise 10 stories and 113 feet, and contain 133 rooms spread across a bit more than 50,000 square feet of net commercial space. Add in common space, mechanicals and a 21-car garage, and the total construction area rises to nearly 70,000 square feet.

Part of the hotel’s relatively large size is attributable to the spacious lots found in industrial areas like Ravenswood, where a single property purchase can net a developer 110 feet of frontage, as with this project. (The property last traded hands in the beginning of 2007 for $2.1 million, though there may have been a tax sale since then.)

While the infusion of commerce and tourists into what is currently a boarded-up vacant lot will be welcome, the dense thicket of hotel construction in the area raises the question of whether the land between the two NYCHA projects – Queensbridge to the south and Ravenswood to the north – should remain “M”-zoned, which forbids residential construction. Formerly industrial land is quickly being eaten up by hotel builders, which, while allowed, was clearly not the intention of the zoning designation.

But given politicians’ animosity towards market-rate residential construction and the slow-moving affordable housing bureaucracy, the land is likely to stay zoned as it is for a while longer, giving ample opportunity for more hotels in the future.

The developer is Ian Cheng, and the architect is Think Architecture & Design. Given the firm’s impressive portfolio, they will hopefully furnish a design that’s at least a half step up from the normal budget hotel fare.

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Posted in 38-42 11th Street | Architecture | Astoria | Hotel | Ian Cheng | Long Island City | New York | Queens | Ravenswood | Think Architecture & Design

Permits Filed: 90-31 171st Street, Jamaica

90-31 171st Street, image from Google Street View

In Jamaica, once Queens’s pre-eminent downtown, the highest demand for housing is just north and east of downtown Jamaica. Rezonings in the 2000s failed to recognize this, instead downzoning these residential neighborhoods on the periphery of downtown while upzoning the downtown itself.

Builders are still not keen on the heart of downtown Jamaica, which has a lot of foot traffic, retail and transit, but little appetite for market-rate residential development, which is necessarily at the higher end of any submarket. Developers are, however, willing to build on the edges of the area that planners have designated for growth – in the case of 90-31 171st Street, a new building planned for Jamaica, right up to the line of where development is supposed to end, at 171st Street.

There, a developer picked up a single-family lot in 2008 for $816,000, and their architect has filed for a new building permit on the site, which would be home to a seven-story, 12-unit apartment building, according to an application submitted to the DOB earlier today.

The permit was filed by Maspeth-based Architects Studio on behalf of developer Kingston Property, with Mizra Rahman listed as a principal. The site is actually directly across the street from No. 90-34, where Architects Studio is designing another building for a different developer.

The apartments at No. 90-31 would be slightly larger than No. 90-34′s, with just 12 units divided across 13,000 square feet of net residential space, for roomy 1,100-square foot apartment size on average. The building would include a single garage parking spot, and the total construction area would reach nearly 20,000 square feet on the 40-foot-wide lot.

If the city wants to see more market-rate development around Jamaica – and given the low price points, with one builder telling YIMBY they were looking to rent brand new one-bedrooms for just $1,600, anyone concerned about affordability should want to see growth here – they’re going to have to listen to the market and allow for more of this sort of development farther east of 171st Street.

Much as planners would like to see more development in the heart of downtown Jamaica, based on the permit filings we’re seeing, the real potential is on the margins.

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Posted in 90-31 171st Street | 90-34 171st Street | Architects Studio | Jamaica | Kingston Property | Mizra Rahman

YIMBY Today: QLIC Tops Out, Development Potential at 27 Beekman, More

Redering of 41-42 24th Street -- image by Perkins Eastman

41-42 24th Street [The Court Square Blog]: QLIC — at 41-42 24th Street, in Long Island City — has topped out at 21 stories; the façade has yet to be installed, but the 421-unit mixed-use building is set to open late next year.

301 East 50th Street [Curbed]: CBSK Ironstate’s 29-story and 57-unit mixed-use building at 301-303 East 50th Street, in Midtown East has topped out, and façade installation is imminent; completion is expect in 2015.

27 Beekman Street [The Real Deal]: Rapid Park is looking to unload a portfolio of parking garages across Manhattan and Brooklyn, and significant development sites include 25-27 Beekman Street, in the Financial District; the four-story garage contains 84,604 square feet of air rights, and additional air rights are for sale above adjacent buildings.

505 West 43rd Street [Curbed]: The Elad Group is putting plans before Community Board 4 to construct 15- and 16-story residential buildings spanning 501-511 West 43rd Street — above Amtrak railroad lines — in Hell’s Kitchen; the buildings are being proposed above the height limit, and designs have not yet been revealed.

64-11 Queens Boulevard [Brownstoner]: A 19,808 square-foot site at 64-11 Queens Boulevard, in Woodside, has been listed for $12 million; development potential amounts to 99,040 square feet.

495 Dean Street [DNAinfo New York]: The State “has begun condemnation proceedings” to acquire a number of properties within the Pacific Park redevelopment zone, specifically the townhouses spanning 491-495 Dean Street, in Prospect Heights; the existing structures are to be demolished to make way for Tower 15, a 27-story and 272-unit residential building.

85 Water Street [Curbed]: Midtown Equities’ retail and office conversion of the four- and five-story brick warehouse buildings at 85 Water Street — in Dumbo — is currently underway; rooftop additions, designed by STUDIO V, are also planned, and the complex is expected to open in October 2015.

112 West 120th Street [Harlem+Bespoke]: A vacant four-story brownstone at 112 West 120th Street, in Harlem, is receiving a penthouse addition.

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Posted in 112 West 120th Street | 27 Beekman Street | 301 East 50th Street | 41-42 24th Street | 495 Dean Street | 505 West 43rd Street | 64-11 Queens Boulevard | 85 Water Street

Permits Filed: 280-Foot Rental Tower Coming to 210 Livingston Street, Downtown Brooklyn

210 Livingston Street pre-demolition, image via Google Maps

Back in February, the Wall Street Journal broke the news that Benenson Capital Partners and Rose Associates were joining forces to develop a rental tower in downtown Brooklyn, at 210 Livingston Street. Aside from the general bulk (they pegged it at 300,000 square feet), though, scant details were released

Now that a new building permit application has been filed, we can fill in some of the details.

The tower should reach 280 feet into the air, and will have 26 floors of rental apartments and ground-level retail. There will be 349 housing units divided between 310,000 square feet of net residential space, served by 112 garage parking spots. 210 Livingston will also hold a bit more than 14,000 square feet of commercial space, for a total construction area of 365,000 square feet – a bit more than twice as dense as the office building that was razed to make way for it.

Handel Architects filed for the permit.

210 Livingston Street, old structure (singe demolished) to the right of the blue dot, overhead shot from Bing Maps

210 Livingston Street, old structure (since demolished) to the right of the blue dot, overhead shot from Bing Maps

The new building application is just one of three recent filings for new towers on Livingston Street. Late last month, plans were submitted for a 17-story building on a small lot farther east on Livingston, at No. 299, while last week a 21-story tower hit DOB records at No. 117.

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Posted in 210 Livingston Street | Benenson Capital Partners | Brooklyn | Downtown Brooklyn | Handel Architects | Rose Associates

DOB Digest: Columbia Manhattanville Expansion, Foxhurst Prep School, More

Concept rendering of future 614 West 131st Street, at left, image by Columbia University

MANHATTAN:

614 West 131st Street: Columbia University has submitted applications in conjunction with their Manhattanville Expansion, with the latest permits outlining a structure for 614-618 West 131st Street. The initial filing specifies a nearly 1,000 square-foot base with two “vertical enlargements” — one totaling 163,556 square feet and standing eight stories, and the second spanning 230,465 square feet and 11 stories. The commercial components will total nearly 12,500 square feet, and FXFOWLE is designing.

209 West 14th Street: Adelco has filed applications for an 11-story and 21-unit mixed-use building of 36,120 square feet spanning 209-211 West 14th Street, in Chelsea; the existing four-story structure was approved to be demolished in July, and Goldstein Hill & West is designing.

BRONX:

1232 Southern Boulevard: An anonymous LLC has filed applications for a six-story and nearly 14,600 square-foot “children’s aid college prep charter school,” which will span 1232-1248 Southern Boulevard, in Foxhurst. An existing two-story structure was approved for demolition in May, and FXFOWLE is designing.

BROOKLYN:

680 Elton Street: An anonymous LLC has filed applications to construct a three-story and three-unit residential building of nearly 3,300 square feet at the vacant lot of 680 Elton Street, in East New York.

455 Flatbush Avenue: Brooklyn Botanic Garden has filed applications to construct a single-story and 850 square-foot “maintenance shed” at 455 Flatbush Avenue, in Prospect Park; Design 2147 is the architect of record.

QUEENS:

151 Oceanside Avenue: Breezy Point Cooperative has filed applications to construct a two-story and single-family abode of 2,080 square feet at 151 Oceanside Avenue, in Breezy Point.

25 Graham Place: Breezy Point Cooperative has filed applications to construct a three-story and single-family abode of 1,742 square feet at 25 Graham Place, in Breezy Point; a previously existing single-story structure was demolished after Superstorm Sandy.

STATEN ISLAND:

263 Poillon Avenue: Applications have been filed for a three-story and two-unit residential building — spanning a total 8,630 square feet — for 263 Poillon Avenue, in Annadale; an existing 2.5-story structure was approved for demolition in August, and Calvanico Associates is designing.

306 Brighton Avenue: Anthony J. Santo has filed applications to construct a four-story and single-family abode of 1,920 square feet at the vacant lot of 306 Brighton Avenue, in Tompkinsville.

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Posted in 1232 Southern Boulevard | 151 Oceanside Avenue | 209 West 14th Street | 25 Graham Place | 263 Poillon Avenue | 306 Brighton Avenue | 455 Flatbush Avenue | 614 West 131st Street | 680 Elton Street

Revealed: Gateway Elton Street, Phase III

Gateway Elton Street, phase III, rendering by Dattner

The Hudson Companies will break ground soon on the third phase of their Gateway Elton Street affordable housing development, which will bring 659 apartments and 70,000 square feet of ground floor retail to the Spring Creek section of Brooklyn, often thought of as part of East New York.

Hudson Companies is developing the entirety of the project, and brought Dattner in to design the third phase. Located at the corner of Flatlands Avenue and Elton Street, the final part of the development includes two mid-rise buildings totaling 357,400 square feet of floor space, with 287 units of affordable housing on a 2.5-acre site.

Per the architect:

Organized around a central courtyard with parking and outdoor recreation areas, both buildings are designed to create strong street frontages and to reinforce the pedestrian-friendly ‘perimeter’ block design of the previous project phases. The project site is located across the street from a new school, and south facades of the buildings will face a proposed neighborhood park.

The first and second phases of Gateway Elton Street (not designed by Dattner) included affordable housing for low-income families, with some units set aside for supportive housing for those transitioning from institutional arrangements to more independent living. Completion is targeted for 2015.

Gateway Elton Street, phase III, rendering by Dattner

Gateway Elton Street, phase III, rendering by Dattner

On all sides, Gateway Elton Street’s new apartments are separated from similarly dense configurations. To the south is Related’s suburban-style Gateway Mall. To the north is a lower-density residential zone west of Elton, and low-density industrial land east of Elton.

Dattner’s building and the others on the site strive to be more urban than New York’s post-war public housing projects, but there’s only so much any architect can do given the surroundings and their removal from public transit. If neighborhoods dominated by public housing like Coney Island and East Harlem are to avoid further decline, planners will have to rezone the areas to include denser private, market-rate development.

If there is enough demand for such investment, this could help avoid the continuation of a subsidized quasi-suburban monoculture, which is especially unfortunate in the context of a generally walkable and urban giant like New York.

 

Posted in Architecture | Brooklyn | Dattner Architects | East New York | Gateway Elton Street | New York | Residential | The Hudson Companies Inc. | Uncategorized

New Look: 250 Ashland Place, Downtown Brooklyn

250 Ashland Place, rendering by FXFowle

We’ve already seen a few renderings of 250 Ashland Place, a 52-story mixed-income tower soon to rise in downtown Brooklyn, but YIMBY’s come across another image, this one depicting the building’s south façade, as it will be seen from Lafayette Avenue.

The light brick façade will still have floor-to-ceiling windows, but without the irregular pattern of the Ashland Avenue face. Luckily it maintains the clean look of the other released renderings, with no unsightly PTACs below the windows.

250 Ashland Place, rendering by FXFowle

250 Ashland Place, rendering by FXFowle as seen from Ashland Place

The project was given the final go-ahead in December, when the Gotham Organization and DT Salazar Inc. closed on $278 million in financing for the tower.

Designed by FXFowle, 282 of the 586 units – ranging from one- to three-bedrooms – will be let at below-market rates. (The income brackets for the “affordable” units will max out at between around $50,000 and $140,000 for families of four, with no very low income or supportive units included.) There will also be 8,000 square feet of office space and 10,200 square feet of retail facing Fulton Street.

Groundbreaking was earlier this year, and upon completion, the tower will stand among the tallest in Brooklyn, rising 568 feet to its roof.

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Posted in 250 Ashland Place | Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | Downtown Brooklyn | DT Salazar | FX Fowle | FXFowle | Gotham Organization | New York | Residential

Construction Update: 133 Greenwich Street

133 Greenwich Street

The new Marriott Courtyard coming to 133 Greenwich Street is quickly rising, and the tower — designed by architect Danny Forster — is already at its fifth floor. Located directly across the street from the World Trade Center, the building will eventually stand 30 stories and 356 feet tall.

The area surrounding the World Trade Center will see rapid changes over the coming decade, as infill development sparked by the site’s re-opening should yield improvements to the neighborhood, which remains mostly deserted at night. Luckily this is starting to change, and several hotels have opened nearby in recent years, including the world’s tallest Holiday Inn at 99 Washington Street.

133 Greenwich Street

133 Greenwich Street and 150 Greenwich, aka 4 World Trade Center

Still, the trend in the vicinity is towards residential development, as it emerges as a place to both live and work. With access to nearly every subway line, including the PATH, the Financial District’s transit infrastructure could easily support apartment buildings with floor areas far greater than currently allowed. In fact, office to residential conversions can actually surpass the FAR limit on new construction, as the structures were pre-existing, showing there is no harm in denser and larger apartment buildings.

While residential is now the highest and best use across most of the Financial District, the zoning at 133 Greenwich Street is not all that generous, and owner Hidrock Realty opted for commercial development. Despite excellent access to nearly every subway line, the new hotel’s total FAR will only measure 13, with the structure spanning 133,000 square feet.

133 Greenwich Street

133 Greenwich Street — image from Danny Forster Design Studio

Danny Forster’s design for the project is nevertheless attractive, and uses several aesthetic tricks to conform to the zoning code. The end result will vastly improve a corner of the Financial

133 Greenwich Street

133 Greenwich Street, 125 Greenwich at rear

District that has long been forlorn, though pedestrians will have to wait until 125 Greenwich is completed before unfettered access is possible, as that site is directly across the street.

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Posted in 133 Greenwich Street | Architecture | FiDi | Hotel | Marriott | New York

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