DOB Digest: 38-Unit Residential Building Coming to 795 Jefferson Avenue in Bed-Stuy, More

809 Jefferson Avenue (church pre-demo), image via Google Maps (Sept. 2014)

BRONX:

3993 White Plains Road: Applications have been filed for a single-story 4,320 square-foot commercial building at the lots 3991-3993 White Plains Road, in southern Wakefield. Howell Belanger Cestelli is designing, and the site’s two-story predecessor was demolished in 2013.

BROOKLYN:

809 Jefferson Avenue: Applications have been filed for a five-story, 38-unit residential building measuring 29,725 square-feet, and a two-story, 5,085 square-foot religious structure at 795-809 Jefferson Avenue, in eastern Bedford-Stuyvesant. SLM Architecture is designing, and an existing two-story structure must first be demolished.

733 Rogers Avenue: An LLC has filed applications for an eight-story, 16-unit residential building measuring 15,045 square feet at 733 Rogers Avenue, in Prospect Lefferts Gardens. Zambrano Architectural Design is the architect, and the existing two-story townhouse was approved for demolition in January.

205 Frost Street: An LLC has filed applications for a four-story, eight-unit residential building measuring 6,250 square feet at 205 Frost Street, in northern Williamsburg. Infocus is designing, and an existing two-story townhouse must first be demolished.

QUEENS:

50-38 44th Street: Applications have been filed for a four-story, three-unit residential building measuring 2,911 square feet at the vacant lot of 50-38 44th Street, in Sunnyside.

193-15 Nero Avenue: Applications have been filed for a two-story, single-family residence measuring nearly 3,800 square feet at 193-15 Nero Avenue, in Jamaica Estates. Frank Quatela is designing, and an existing two-story home must first be demolished.

144-69 29th Avenue: Applications have been filed for a two-story, single-family residence measuring 2,560 square feet at 144-69 29th Avenue, in northern Flushing. The existing two-story abode was approved for demolition last December.

99-63 165th Avenue: Applications have been filed for a three-story, single-family residence measuring 1,500 square feet at 99-63 165th Avenue, in southern Old Howard Beach. The site’s two-story predecessor was demolished in 2014.

STATEN ISLAND:

1034 Olympia Boulevard: Bluestone RRSI has filed applications for a three-story, single-family home measuring nearly 1,100 square feet at 1034 Olympia Boulevard, in Midland Beach. An existing single-story structure must first be demolished.

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Posted in 1034 Olympia Boulevard | 144-69 29th Avenue | 193-15 Nero Avenue | 205 Frost Street | 3993 White Plains Road | 50-38 44th Street | 733 Rogers Avenue | 809 Jefferson Avenue | 99-63 165th Avenue

Sam Chang Hotel Planned for 111 East 24th Street

Whatever you want to call them — NoMad, Gramercy, or Flatiron — the neighborhoods surrounding Madison Square Park are some of the hottest in the city right now. And despite the fact that the city’s hotel market appears to be headed for a monumental glut, Manhattan’s most prolific hotelier will soon plop another of his signature budget hotels on the parcel at 111 East 24th Street.

Sam Chang’s plan, per a filing with the Department of Buildings, is to erect a 13-story, 120-key hotel on the 60-foot-wide lot. The rooms, 10 per floor, will be spread over more than 38,000 square feet of zoning area, for an average room size just shy of 240 square feet.

The architect is – who else? – Gene Kaufman, and the building is planned to rise 140 feet.

Chang won’t own the land beneath the hotel, but rather will lease it. The Commercial Observer reported last November that the hotel builder landed a 99-year triple-net lease for the property, now home to a parking lot, paying $900,000 a year for the dirt.

Mid-block between Park Avenue South and Lexington, the site is surrounded on three sides by buildings edging right up to the lot lines, making the parcel less desirable to luxury condo builders, who might otherwise have outbid Chang for the East 24th Street site (though the longterm lease arrangement may also have turned them off).

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Posted in 111 East 24th Street | Architecture | Gramercy | Hotel | Kaufman | Manhattan | New York | NoMad | Sam Chang

Revealed: 1580 Nostrand Avenue, Flatbush

1580 Nostrand Avenue, rendering by Loadingdock5

Last July, YIMBY brought you word of an unusual permit filing at 1580 Nostrand Avenue, in the Flatbush section of central Brooklyn. The application called for a 23-story, 241-foot-tall building, taking up most of the block bounded by Nostrand Avenue, Albemarle Road, East 29th Street, and Tilden Avenue, with frontage on the first three streets.

Now, we’ve obtained renderings of a design for the site, done by Loadingdock5 (although Vincent Martineau is listed as the architect of record on the permit).

Developed by Eli Karp’s Hello Living, the project is likely to be a condo building. The firm specializes in building condos at price points that are more affordable than the typical fare in more established neighborhoods like Prospect Heights or Clinton Hill.

1580 Nostrand Avenue, rendering by Loadingdock5

1580 Nostrand Avenue, rendering by Loadingdock5

The design features a taper as the tower reaches skyward (going from up to a dozen apartments on the fourth floor to just three on the 23rd), somewhat minimizing the impact of the building’s height. The tower will be about as tall as 626 Flatbush Avenue, Hudson’s project on the other side of Flatbush, in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, which has caused much consternation (although the architecture for 1580 Nostrand is arguably more attractive than the PTAC-pocked 626 Flatbush, and definitely more interesting).

1580 Nostrand Avenue

1580 Nostrand Avenue

The building is planned to have 153 apartments, spread over 129,000 square feet of space. The average unit size of 840 square feet would normally be indicative of rentals, but condos are Hello Living’s bread and butter. With little common area that doesn’t count towards zoning, it’s possible the building will have private keyed elevators, saving on construction costs.

The housing would be perched atop two stories of walk-in medical offices measuring 45,000 square feet, per the permit filing, with the site not far from the hospital complex containing the Kings County and SUNY Downstate medical centers. Taking advantage of this community facility bonus – along with the site’s large footprint (the lot, originally home to a one-story brick warehouse, is more than 54,000 square feet in size) – is what allows Hello Living to reach 23 stories in an R6 zone, where developers normally stick to tenement-scale construction.

Hello Living picked up the development site late last year for more than $13 million, or $76 per buildable square foot including the community facility space – a huge premium over the $4 million that it traded for before that, in 2012.

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Posted in 1580 Nostrand Avenue | Architecture | Brooklyn | Flatbush | Hello Living | Loadingdock5 | New York | Residential | Vincent Martineau

Landmarks Sends Plans For 807 Park Avenue Back To The Drawing Board

Proposed design for 807 Park Avenue

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. And after several attempts to negotiate approval, the developers of 807 Park Avenue will have to try once more to win over the Landmarks Preservation Commission, in their effort to redevelop the site. Their demolish the current building at 807 Park Avenue and construct a new 12-story building in its place seems to have met its end. The sticking point: the fragment of the original building at the site.

807 Park Avenue was originally five stories tall and completed by the firm Neville & Bagge in 1899, when elevated trains ran along what was called Fourth Avenue. Sometime between 1980 and 1983, its height was more than doubled and changes were made to the original façade. Further changes were made in 2005, after it was purchased from Puff Daddy for $14.3 million (he bought it in 1999 for $12 million). In the end, all that remained of that original building was the façade and some of the curtain wall. However, when it comes to the façade, the first floor was cut away, leaving only the second through fifth floors relatively intact.

Views of the current building

Views of the current building

Aion Partners now owns the building, and hired architect Charles Platt of PBDW Architects and Bill Higgins of the preservation firm Higgins Quasebarth & Partners to design a new building to replace it, but several of the commissioners wanted the original fragment retained. The presentation process included three sessions where Platt and Higgins tried to convince the commissioners that the fragment wasn’t worth retaining, and that retaining it would be impractical. It was quite lengthy and you can read about those first two hearings here and here.

Photos showing unusual floor heights in the current building

Photos showing unusual floor heights in the current building

But on Tuesday, at the third hearing on the issue, the current proposal for a new building was finally put to death.. Platt called what is there now a “failed building.” He talked of unusually low floor heights. And Higgins cited preservationist James Marston Fitch, who said “curatorial decisions” have to be made and a range of interventions considered. “[This] does not rise to the level,” Higgins said.

Commissioner Frederick Bland agreed, saying “a fragment is not a building” and “all fragments are not created equal.” Commissioner Diana Chapin said it was a “very difficult decision,” but it is a “façade, not a structure.” Commissioner Wellington Chen said he could see both sides, but the decision comes down to “integrity.” He said he was leaning towards approving the design.

The fragment overlaid on the proposed design

The fragment overlaid on the proposed design

However, the rest of the commissioners could not vote to approve the proposal. Where will things go from here? It’s hard to say, but LPC chair Meenakshi Srinivasan told the applicant that an entirely new approach is required.

Evan Bindelglass is a local freelance journalist, photographer, cinephile, and foodie. You can e-mail him, follow him on Twitter @evabin, or check out his personal blog.

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Posted in 807 Park Avenue | Aion Partners | Architecture | Higgins Quasebarth and Partners | New York | Platt Byard Dovell White | Platt Byard Dovell White Architects | Residential | Upper East Side

Permits Filed: 1753 East 12th Street, Homecrest

1753 East 12th Street, image from Google Maps

Normally when we see a filing calling for a 1,500-square foot condos in Brooklyn, it would be in Dumbo or Williamsburg, with large units catering to wealthy buyers who would otherwise look in Manhattan.

But there’s also demand for large, family-sized units in less trendy southern Brooklyn, catering to the borough’s booming population of Orthodox Jews.

Such is the case at 1753 East 12th Street, a project for which an application was submitted earlier today to the Department of Buildings to erect a 12-unit condo building. The development would be located just south of Kings Highway in Homecrest, sometimes considered the northern subsection of Sheepshead Bay, but increasingly a southern extension of Midwood, a neighborhood dominated by Jewish New Yorkers of various levels of orthodoxy.

The 12 apartments – likely condos – would be spread out over more than 18,000 square feet of net residential space, for an average unit size of nearly 1,530 square feet. There would be two per floor from the second through the seventh floor (the building tops out at 65 feet), with seven parking spaces in an open area on the ground level (though none are required by code) and a lobby and gym for residents.

Nouri Chaya is listed as the developer, and Gerald Caliendo as the architect.

The developer bought the site – a 40-foot-wide lot, currently home to a single-family detached home – in September of last year for $1.9 million, or $104 per buildable square foot.

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Posted in 1753 East 12th Street | Gerald Caliendo Architect | Homecrest | Midwood | Nouri Chaya | Sheepshead Bay

YIMBY Today: Barnard’s 12-Story Academic Facility at 3009 Broadway in Morningside Heights Revealed, More

3009 Broadway, rendering via Columbia Spectator

3009 Broadway [West Side Rag]: Barnard is planning to demolish the existing five-story building at 3009 Broadway, in Morningside Heights, to make way for the Teaching and Learning Center. The latest revisions reveal twelve and five-story buildings containing classrooms, offices and the library. Opening of the new facility is expected in 2018.

185 Bowery

185 Bowery, image via Bowery Boogie

185 Bowery [Bowery Boogie]: Renderings have been posted on-site at 185-191 Bowery, in the Bowery, where CitizenM began excavation on their planned 19-story, 300-room hotel building. Also planned is a nearly 3,400 square-foot public plaza, and “completion is expected in the winter of 2016.”

79-40 Copper Avenue [Commercial Observer]: Carye & Sons Acquisitions has acquired eight lots at 79-40 Cooper Avenue, in southern Middle Village, for “around $7 million.” Plans include redeveloping the existing 50,000 square-foot industrial building “into an 80,000 square-foot self-storage and retail building.”

10 Jay Street

Approved 10 Jay Street, rendering by ODA Architecture

10 Jay Street [Commercial Observer]: The Landmarks Preservation Commission has approved plans for the existing 10-story building at 10-18 Jay Street, in Dumbo, to be converted into 46 condominiums and retail space. Triangle Assets and Glacier Global Partners are developing, and completion is expected by Fall 2016.

3100 Atlantic Avenue [The Real Deal]: Bluestone Group, along with other investors, has acquired the two-story, 210-unit apartment complex at 3100-3124 Atlantic Avenue, in northern East New York. The two-block complex will be redeveloped into affordable housing.

42-60 Crescent Street

42-60 Crescent Street, image by The Court Square Blog

42-60 Crescent Street [The Court Square Blog]: Construction is up to the eighth floor of the 10-story, 40-unit mixed-use building rising at 42-60 Crescent Street, in Long Island City. Commercial space will total 2,309 square feet, and completion can be expected by the end of this year.

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Posted in 10 Jay Street | 185-191 Bowery | 3009 Broadway | 3100 Atlantic Avenue | 42-60 Crescent Street | 79-40 Copper Avenue

DOB Digest: Filings for 229 Lexington Avenue, More

229 Lexington Avenue, image by C3D Architecture

MANHATTAN:

229 Lexington Avenue: Revealed by YIMBY last fall, NY Lions Group has filed applications for their planned 14-story, 36-unit mixed-use building measuring 33,520 square feet at 227-229 Lexington Avenue, in Kips Bay. The building will accommodate 2,528 square feet of commercial space, and the existing two and four-story buildings were approved for demolition in 2014.

985 3rd Avenue: Macklowe has filed applications for a single-story, 7,613 square-foot commercial building, rising 47 feet, at the lot of 989 3rd Avenue, in Midtown East. Cetra Ruddy is designing, and an existing three-story structure was approved for demolition in November. A residential project is planned immediately to the south.

BROOKLYN:

8820 Avenue J: New York B Realty Corp. has revived plans for a three-story, 24-unit residential building measuring 21,842 square feet at the vacant lot 8820 Avenue J, in Canarsie. Prime Design Group is designing.

780 New York Avenue: RDG Queens V LLC has filed applications for a four-story, eight-unit residential building measuring 6,730 square feet at 780 New York Avenue, in Prospect Lefferts Gardens. Gerald Caliendo is designing, and an existing 2.5-story structure must first be demolished.

303 Stockholm Street: Filed in early 2014, new applications reveal plans for a five-story, eight-unit residential building measuring 5,500 square feet at 303 Stockholm Street, in northern Bushwick. Juan Defonseca is designing, and the site’s single-story predecessor was demolished last December.

203 Halsey Street: An LLC has filed applications for a four-story, two-unit residential building measuring 3,717 square feet at the vacant lot of 203 Halsey Street, in central Bedford-Stuyvesant. Arnold Montag is designing, and the site’s three-story predecessor was demolished in 2009.

4202 Avenue T: Applications have been filed for a two-story, single-family residence measuring 3,050 square feet at 4202 Avenue T, in Marine Park. An existing 1.5-story abode must first be demolished.

QUEENS:

100-32 201st Street: Ziba Management Corp. has filed applications for two two-story, two-unit residential buildings — each measuring nearly 2,100 square feet — at the vacant lots of 100-32 – 100-34 201st Street, in Hollis. The site’s two-story predecessor was demolished in 2007.

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Posted in 100-32 201st Street | 1753 East 12th Street | 203 Halsey Street | 229 Lexington Avenue | 303 Stockholm Street | 4202 Avenue T | 780 New York Avenue | 8820 Avenue J | 985 3rd Avenue

Lightstone Plans 50-Story Condo/Hotel for 130 William Street, Financial District

130 William Street (Fulton Street side), image from Google Maps

Six months ago, the Lightstone Group (of Gowanus megaproject fame) sold their site at 112-118 Fulton Street in the Financial District for $171 million, to San Francisco-based Carmel Partners.

But that doesn’t mean the developer is out of downtown. Instead, they’ve merely shifted their ambitions one block eastward, to an assemblage on (or, more precisely, around) the southeastern corner of Fulton and William streets.

There, at 130 William Street, the development firm is planning to erect a 50-story hotel and condo tower, according to plans filed with the Department of Buildings this afternoon, submitted by Goldstein, Hill & West Architects.

Old rendering of 92 Fulton

An earlier rendering for 92 Fulton Street, part of the assemblage

The skyscraper would reach 581 feet into the air, according to the filing, and include 188 apartments – likely condos – perched above an unspecified number of hotel rooms. The first and second floors would house retail, with the third through fifth floors set aside for residential and hotel amenity spaces. The hotel rooms would start on the sixth floor and reach through to the 17th, after which a mechanical floor would buffer the short-stay rooms from the permanent apartments.

Starting on the 19th floor, we find the apartments, with six units on each level up through the 49th floor (with the 34th floor set aside for residential amenities). There would then be one final apartment on the penthouse level, taking up the whole 50th floor. In total, the 188 apartments would be spread over 236,000 square feet of residential space, for an average unit size of over 1,250 square feet, strongly hinting at condos.

The hotel and retail space, meanwhile, would total 101,000 square feet.

The assemblage sits around, but not on, the corner of Fulton and William streets, stretching from 130 William Street south of Fulton (which Lightstone acquired earlier this year for $60 million) around to Gold Street and Fulton, but does not include 138 William Street, at the corner with Fulton.

Fisher Brothers owns 92 Fulton Street in the middle of the assemblage, having bought the site last June for $10 million. This could mean that they’re a partner in the development, or that they merely intend to sell the site to Lightstone.

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Posted in 130 William Street | Architecture | Financial District | Goldstein Hill West | Manhattan | New York | Residential | The Lightstone Group

Revealed: 1277 East 14th Street

1277 East 14th Street, image by Woods Bagot

Last December, YIMBY reported on new filings for a 308-unit development coming to 1263 East 14th Street, in Brooklyn’s Midwood neighborhood. Now, we have the reveal for the building, which has an official address of 1277 East 14th Street. Woods Bagot is the architect of record while Hampshire Properties is the developer.

Like most new rental developments in New York City, PTACs will punctuate the facade of 1277 East 14th Street. But besides the continued scourge of the environmentally-unfriendly and aesthetically-unpleasing air conditioning units, the overall project will be fairly attractive.

Woods Bagot is also responsible for the design of 213 Jay Street and the four-building Gramercy Square project, and the decision to value-engineer development with PTACs falls upon developers, not architects. The firm has a penchant for contemporary but contextual design, and 1277 East 14th Street will feature a two-toned brick facade as well as a smattering of balconies.

The project will replace an old 85,000 square foot school, and the new building will total 277,406 square feet. Given the average unit size of approximately 900 square feet — and the presence of PTACs — rentals would appear likely.

No completion date has been announced but the development’s permits were denied last week. Demolition permits are also currently lacking, but the new renderings are hopefully a sign that work will soon begin.

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Posted in 1263 East 14th Street | 1277 East 14th Street | 1277 Locust Avenue | Architecture | Hampshire Properties | Midwood | New York | Residential | Woods Bagot Architects

Revealed: 1312 Lincoln Place, Crown Heights

1312 Lincoln Place, rendering by RoArt

Boaz Gilad, perhaps central Brooklyn’s most prolific builder, has made a name for himself with projects centered around neighborhoods like Prospect Heights and Clinton Hill. But with land becoming increasingly dear and gentrification skyrocketing east across Brooklyn, Gilad and builders like him are seeking out sites much farther from the city’s core, in areas like the Weeksville subsection of Crown Heights, around and past Utica Avenue.

One such project can be found at 1312 Lincoln Place. Applications for a pair of new six-story buildings were submitted towards the end of last year, for 1308 and 1314 Lincoln Place (called No. 1312 on the rendering we’ve obtained). The site is on the narrow two-lane street just a block north of Eastern Parkway, mid-block between Schenectady and Utica avenues.

1308 & 1314 Lincoln Place, image from Bing Maps

1308 & 1314 Lincoln Place (empty lot at center), image from Bing Maps

The pair of buildings is planned to have 26 apartments between them, spread over a bit more than 17,000 square feet of residential space, for an average unit size of around 660 square feet – the minimum allowed by zoning and normally indicative of rentals, although in the past Gilad has focused on condos, and the design as rendered lacks the PTAC units beneath the windows that normally mark properties as rentals.

The design is attractive enough, although the ground floor, dominated by parking, leaves something to be desired. Unfortunately, the architects (Feingold & Gregory are on the permit, but RoArt appears to be the design architect) didn’t have much choice – the zoning code requires parking (14 spaces will be included, the minimum allowed) and disallows ground-floor retail, leaving the developer with no economical choice other than to build the first floors as parking garages.

The development site was acquired in May of last year for a bit over $2 million, or around $120 per buildable square foot.

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Posted in 1308 Lincoln Place | 1312 Lincoln Place | 1314 Lincoln Place | Architecture | Boaz Gilad | Brookland Capital | Brooklyn | Crown Heights | Feingold & Gregory Architects | New York | Residential | RoArt

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