Revealed: 1561 Walton Avenue, Mount Eden, Bronx

1561 Walton Avenue, image from Settlement Housing

Earlier this week, we brought you news of a new building permit filing for 1561 Walton Avenue, an affordable housing project just off the Grand Concourse and a block south of the Cross-Bronx Expressway, in the Mount Eden section of the Bronx.

Today, we have an drawing of the project, which is being designed by Edelman Sultan Knox Wood.

While the drawing only depicts the front elevation, the image shows the color and massing the project, which exhibits much more creativity than your average new South Bronx affordable housing development. The brick building has the look of four thinner ones, each stepped down to a different height and with a different color. Because it will sit on an odd, triangularly shaped lot, the narrow wedge will be left as open planted space.

The 60-unit building is being developed by the Settlement Housing Fund, alongside the Briarwood Organization, who is also acting as the general contractor. The units will be affordable to households making 40 percent to 90 percent of the area median income, with average median income defined here as around $60,000 for an individual or $86,000 for a family of four.

Construction, we’re told, is set to begin in July 2015.

The units will be fairly large, at around 900 square feet on average, spread over 54,000 square feet of residential space. The project’s total cost was listed as $20 million, and it will sit on a former parking lot.

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Posted in 1561 Walton Avenue | Architecture | Bronx | Mount Eden | New York | Residential | South Bronx

Permits Filed: 868 Lorimer Avenue, on McCarren Park in Greenpoint

868 Lorimer Street, image from Google Maps

On a 50-foot-wide through-block site on McCarren Park, mid-block between Driggs and Nassau in Greenpoint, a new residential building is set to rise at 868 Lorimer Avenue.

A new building permit application was filed on behalf of Chatham Development Company yesterday for a seven-story building on the park. The Schedule A suggests that the building will be broken up into a six-story “east tower” and a seven-story “west tower.” The east tower will hold two apartment per floor except for the full-floor penthouse at the top, while the west tower will be full-floor apartments topped by a duplex penthouse.

The project will be fairly boutique, with only 14 units spread over 25,000 square feet of residential space. Given the large unit sizes (the average is nearly 1,800 square feet), the large amount of parking (17, or more than the number of apartments and more than twice as many as required by code), and the tall ceilings (a bit over 12 feet from floor to floor, apparently maxing out the area’s height limit), we’re guessing it will be condos. A small 650-square foot retail bay would also be included.

The development firm’s past work includes Chatham 44, a 58-unit condo building at 10th Avenue at 44th Street, which was designed by the Stephen B. Jacobs Group, the same firm listed on 868 Lorimer’s permit application.

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Posted in 868 Lorimer Avenue | Architecture | Brooklyn | Chatham Development Company | Greenpoint | New York | Residential | Stephen B. Jacobs Group

New Look: 100 Barclay, Ralph Walker Conversion in Tribeca

100 Barclay, renderings by Williams New York

Hot off the success of JDS and Property Markets Group’s Walker Tower conversion in Chelsea (one of the penthouses, asking $47.5 million, just entered into contract) and their smaller Stella Tower uptown, another developer is trying their hand at working the same magic on an earlier Ralph Walker-designed building: the Verizon Building downtown (or the Barclay-Vesey Building, or the New York Telephone Company Building, depending on your era), at 140 West Street.

100 Barclay, renderings by Williams New York

100 Barclay, renderings by Williams New York

Rebranded as 100 Barclay, the bulky 32-story tower at the foot of Tribeca – considered by architectural historians to be the first Art Deco skyscraper, setting the stage for the Empire State Building, Rockefeller Center, and many others – is being repurposed into luxury condominiums by Ben Shaoul’s Magnum Real Estate Group and the CIM Group (of 432 Park fame). The teaser site is up, and we’ve grabbed a few renderings of the completed renovation, which is currently under way.

100 Barclay, renderings by Williams New York

100 Barclay, renderings by Williams New York

The ceiling of the lobby is replete with Art Deco motifs, depicting the progression of human communication throughout the ages, with images of carrier pigeons, West African drums, Native American smoke signals, an Egyptian megaphone, medieval flag signals, among others.

100 Barclay, image from HWPR

100 Barclay, image from HWPR

As with the two other Walker conversions uptown, Verizon will be staying on the lower 10 floors of the building. But atop that, CIM and Magnum are carving out 161 luxury condos, ranging from modest one-bedroom units to extravagant five-bedroom spreads (the penthouse will be a duplex, spanning the 31st and 32nd floors). Sales should commence later this year or early next, with the Times quoting prices in the $2,000s per square foot.

The interiors will be done by Champalimaud & GRADE, Ismael Leyva is the architect of record, and DXA Studio is the landmarks and exterior design architect.

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Posted in 100 Barclay | Alexandra Champalimaud | Ben Shaoul | CIM | DXA Studio | Ismael Leyva | Magnum Real Estate Group | Tribeca

YIMBY Today: Manhattan West’s Platform Completed, Pier55 Plans Revealed, More

Pier55, rendering by Thomas Heatherwick

Pier55 [Wall Street Journal]: Barry Diller has provided $100 million in funding for the development of the $130million, 2.7-acre Pier55, located in the Hudson River off the Meatpacking District. Demolition of existing Pier 54 “will begin in 2016,” and Thomas Heatherwick is designing.

88 Schermerhorn Street [Brownstoner]: Developer Second Development Services has filed demolition permits for the four-story walk-up at 88 Schermerhorn Street, in Downtown Brooklyn. The site “allows a building as large as 33,330 square feet,” and the developer has plans for “a 20-story condo” project.

179 Ludlow Street, rendering by Kleinmann Architects

179 Ludlow Street, rendering by Kleinmann Architects

179 Ludlow Street [Curbed]: Construction is about to wrap up at the eight-story, six-unit residential and commercial building of 9,704 square feet at 179 Ludlow Street, in the Lower East Side. The building’s residences have hit the market, and Kleinmann Architects had designed.

131 East 47th Street [Commercial Observer]: Extell’s “four-building site with 128,034 square feet” of building potential — spanning 131-141 East 47th Street, in Midtown East — is nearing a sale for roughly $80 million. The mixed-use development site is currently occupied by an 11-story parking garage, and multiple four-story walkups.

Manhattan West

Manhattan West, image from Brookfield

Manhattan West [DNAinfo New York]: Brookfield has competed the “2.6-acre, 120,000 square-foot platform” near Penn Station ahead of their planned multi-tower development Manhattan West. The developer will begin work on 401 West 31st Street — a 790-unit residential tower — early next year, and is expected to finish in 2017; the first of two office towers, the 69-story 1 Manhattan West, is expected to open by 2018.

526 Union Avenue [Commercial Observer]: Alliance Private Capital Group has purchased the vacant lot at 526 Union Avenue — in Williamsburg — for $9.6 million. The site contains 36,000 square feet of development potential, and the developer “intends to build a residential property.”

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Posted in 131 East 47th Street | 179 Ludlow Street | 526 Union Avenue | 88 Schermerhorn Street | Manhattan West | Pier55

DOB Digest: Excavation to Begin on 95-Unit 5278 Post Road in Fieldston, More

5278 Post Road -- the T-shaped lot at center above the field, overhead shot from Bing Maps

BRONX:

5278 Post Road: Applications have been filed to begin construction of the planned seven-story, 95-unit residential building of 86,841 square feet at 5278 Post Road, in Fieldston. Purcell Architects is designing, and a completion date has not yet been disclosed.

BROOKLYN:

311 Wallabout Street: Applications have been filed for a four-story, three-unit residential building of 13,000 square feet at 311 Wallabout Street, in the Broadway Triangle. Jeffrey Kamen is listed as the architect, and an existing two-story structure must first be demolished.

1824 East 5th Street: Applications have been filed for a three-story, single-family mansion of 5,500 square feet at the vacant lot of 1825 East 5th Street, in northern Gravesend. Hesham Elshamy is listed as architect.

314 Evergreen Avenue: Stan Green LLC has filed another application for a four-story, eight-unit residential building of nearly 5,400 square feet this time at 316 Evergreen Avenue, in Bushwick. Diego Aguilera is designing, and an existing three-story townhouse must first be demolished.

1136 Decatur Street: Ely Properties have filed applications for a four-story, two-unit residential building of 3,667 square feet at the vacant lot of 1136 Decatur Street, in Bushwick. Banji Awosika is designing.

QUEENS:

116-12 Farmers Boulevard: Oak Homes Inc. has filed applications for a two-story, two-unit residential building of 1,858 square feet at the vacant lot of 116-12 Farmers Boulevard, in St. Albans.

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Posted in 1136 Decatur Street | 116-12 Farmers Boulevard | 1824 East 5th Street | 311 Wallabout Street | 314 Evergreen Avenue | 5278 Post Road

Landmarks Commission Not Ready To Approve New Building At 112 Atlantic Avenue

112 Atlantic Avenue

On Tuesday, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, heard a proposal to build a four-story residential building in Cobble Hill, but did not give it the go-ahead. The concept for 112 Atlantic Avenue (at the corner of Henry Street) has eight residential units, plus commercial space and a nine-car automated parking garage entrance on the ground floor (with the actual parking spaces being located on the cellar level). The commercial space would require a variance from the Bureau of Standards and Appeals.

112atlantic_20141118_09

The BKSK-designed building would replace an existing on-site gas station, which has been there since about 1960. The proposed building was mostly red brick with aluminum windows that mimic steel. The intention is for signage to match the size of the that down Atlantic Avenue, only with possible backlighting, but the presentation did not reflect that. There would be a two foot, six inch cornice and roof space for the penthouse units. The entrance to the garage would be on Henry Street and feature frosted glass. The storefront would also wrap around on to Henry Street, resulting in an essentially double-height first floor there.

112atlantic_20141118_14

All of the commissioners felt that the site deserved redevelopment and none of them seemed to object to the idea of a four-story building with commercial space on the first floor. Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan said the “form is very contextual.” Commissioner Adi Shamir-Baron said it was “appropriate-ish.” Commissioner Michael Devonshire said it was “aesthetically pleasing.” Commissioner Diana Chapin applauded the use of materials and called it “reasonable.” Commissioner Frederick Bland said it was within the “realm of appropriateness” and liked that it had its “own character.” Commissioner Michael Goldblum said it fit in quite nicely.

112atlantic_20141118_16

Despite all of that, they weren’t ready to approve it. Chapin felt there was not enough weight on the bottom of the building and that it seemed to “float.” She wasn’t the only one. Baron wanted a more solid base and more brick overall. So too did Bland. Devonshire said they can’t be slaves to context, but that the building still needed more work. Goldblum said that the punched windows, lacking here, are what tie the streetscape together.

112atlantic_20141118_07

One big point of contention was the large elevator bulkhead. The design team admitted that there is no need for handicapped access to the roof and it was decided that it could be reduced in size if the elevator just stopped at the top floor.

112atlantic_20141118_17

Barbara Zay of the Historic Districts Council said there was “much to be admired in the proposed design, particularly the applicant’s use of masonry and quoins on the building’s piers, and is glad to see a building proposed for this underutilized site.” But, she added, “the proposed building calls much attention to itself with its use of large, industrial-looking windows that might be more appropriate in Red Hook.”

112atlantic_20141118_02

Robert Levine, who heads Community Board 6’s landmarks committee, was happy to see a proposal for the site, but could not support the design as proposed. Christabel Gough of the Society for the Architecture of the City also objected to the design, as did the Cobble Hill Association and all but one other speaker.

112atlantic_20141118_08   112atlantic_20141118_25

In the end, Srinivasan asked that the applicant come back with changes including a reduced elevator bulkhead and a scaled down design for Henry Street. A date has not yet been set for that presentation.

Evan Bindelglass is a local freelance journalist, photographer, cinephile, and foodie. You can e-mail him, follow him on Twitter @evabin, or check out his personal blog.

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Posted in 112 Atlantic Avenue | Architecture | BKSK Architects | Brooklyn | Cobble Hill | New York | Residential

New Look: 177-30 Wexford Terrace, Jamaica Estates

177-30 Wexford Terrace, rendering by DeFonseca Architect

As the real estate recovery takes hold, the outer edges of the outer boroughs are starting to see more construction activity. While not as trendy as neighborhoods in western Brooklyn and Queens, areas like eastern Queens, southern Brooklyn, and the northern Bronx are strongholds of middle-class New Yorkers, and are home to some of the most affordable new market-rate construction in the city.

TCX Development has been particularly active in the neighborhoods north of downtown Jamaica, which are desirable enough to merit new construction but not so gentrified as to be completely unaffordable to the middle class. In August, they shared with YIMBY a rendering of their 190-11 Hillside Avenue project – one of the first, if not the first, market-rate residential project to break ground in Jamaica since the 2007 rezoning.

Construction on that building is wrapping up, but now TCX has shared an updated rendering for another project they’re about to break ground on in the area: 177-30 Wexford Terrace, an eight-story building in nearby Jamaica Estates, a 35-minute ride on the F train to Midtown.

Also designed by DeFonseca Architects, the look is modern but staid, with inset balconies. The façade is unsullied by PTAC grills below the windows (this project and the one discussed below will have mini-splits or central air), giving it a clean look that’s difficult to find even in much higher-priced rentals in Manhattan and on the Brooklyn and Queens waterfronts.

The building will will have a walk-in healthcare facility on the ground floor, topped by 54,000 square feet of residential space with 68 apartments, ranging from studios to two-bedrooms. Pricing will depend on where the market goes in the time between now and when the building opens, but TCX’s Joshua Asherian told us that they’re planning for monthly rents that start at $1,550 for the studios, $1,750 for the one-bedrooms, $2,200 for the two-bedroom units, and $2,600 for the penthouses. There will be 47 parking spaces in total, and a rooftop terrace for all tenants in addition to the individual balconies.

A few lots down, TCX is also preparing to break ground on a smaller project, at 177-16 Wexford Terrace. That eight-story building will have 20 apartments spread over nearly 18,000 square feet of residential space, largely consisting of one-bedroom rentals. The designer is Frank Petruso Architect, and the façade will also have a modern look and no unsightly PTAC units. The new building permit indicates that three open air parking spaces will be provided, though according to zoning, none are required.

Demolition of the old single-family home at No. 177-30 (which TCX picked up for $3.45 million, or around $55 per buildable square foot) is complete, and groundbreaking for the new building should occur within the next two to three months, after which the building will take 14 to 18 months to build and lease up, according to Asherian. No. 177-16 (purchased for $800,000 last year, or around $40 a buildable square foot) should be completed on a similar timeframe, if not a few months earlier.

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Posted in 177-16 Wexford Terrace | 177-30 Wexford Terrace | Architecture | DeFonseca Architects | Frank Petruso Architect | Jamaica | Jamaica Estates | New York | Queens | Residential | TCX Development

Permits Filed: 18-14 & 18-16 Gates Avenue, Ridgewood

14-16 and 14-18 Gates Avenue, image from Google Maps

Paging through Department of Buildings filings, YIMBY has seen a number of applications over the past few months for new buildings around the border of Ridgewood and Bushwick, and especially around the Myrtle–Wyckoff Avenues station on the L and M trains. As developers are priced out of the more prime sections of East Williamsburg and Bushwick, they’ve pushed deeper into northern Brooklyn – so deep, in fact, that they occasionally hit Queens.

But a pair of filings for new buildings at 18-14 Gates Avenue and 18-16 Gates Avenue are the first we’ve seen in recent months for new apartments so deep into Ridgewood that they’re not within walking distance of the L or J. Located between Seneca and Onderdonk Avenues, the buildings would be just around the corner from the Seneca Avenue M elevated station, just three stops from the end of the line.

There, Samsol Gates LLC – led by Solomon Jacobowitz, who gets his mail sent to 199 Lee Avenue, the same address as every property owner in South Williamsburg – plans to erect a pair of identical four-story buildings. The designer is listed as Diego Aguilera Architects, based in Rego Park.

Each of the buildings would have seven apartments (rentals, surely) spread across 4,800 square feet of space – two units on the first through third floors, and one full floor unit up top. The buildings would have no parking, and indeed parking requirements would seem to be the reason the development was broken up into two separate structures – had the 14 apartments been in the same building, the developer would have been required to include seven spaces. Instead, the builder opted to pay a lesser price to duplicate mechanical equipment and common areas.

No fires in the '70s mean there aren't many developable sites in Ridgewood today

No fires in the ’70s mean there aren’t many developable sites in Ridgewood today

Ridgewood is unlikely, however, to ever see the same sort of development as Williamsburg and Bushwick, thanks to a dearth of buildable sites. Unlike its neighbors to the south and west, Ridgewood never saw the same level of white flight and disinvestment, and didn’t experience the same burning and abandonment that freed up land for development in those other neighborhoods. To this day, Ridgewood remains 40 percent non-Hispanic white, compared with around 10 percent for Bushwick.

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Posted in 18-14 Gates Avenue | 18-16 Gates Avenue | Architecture | New York | Residential | Ridgewood | Samsol Gates LLC | Solomon Jacobowitz

Permits Filed: 820 Bergen Street, Crown Heights

820 Bergen Street, image from Google Maps

The northwestern corner of Crown Heights – the only part of the trendy central Brooklyn neighborhood with both the zoning and the empty lots to support growth – was heavily developed during the last boom. But some developable sites still remain, and one builder found one at 820 Bergen Street. According to a new building permit application filed this afternoon, seven stories of apartments are slated to rise at the site, located between Classon and Grand Avenues.

The building is planned to have 19,300 square feet of residential space, divided between 16 apartments, for an average unit size of over 1,200 square feet – if we had to guess, we’d say condos. The Schedule A filing indicates two units on the ground floor, three on the second through fourth floors, and four on the fifth, plus one duplex spanning the second and third floors, and two more on the sixth and seventh (which, confusingly, adds up to 18 units).

Nine car parking spaces are planned (either exactly the number required, or one more, depending on how many units end up being built), along with parking for 18 bicycles.

The developer is shielded behind an LLC, but the officer listed on the permit is Mylene Liggett, with Liggett Realtors (according to city records, John-Peter Liggett bought the land in 1987, and transferred it in 2003 to the LLC that’s now developing it). Bricolage Designs is the architect.

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Posted in 820 Bergen Street | Bricolage Design | Crown Heights | Mylene Liggett

YIMBY Today: 265 State Street Revealed, CAMBA Gardens Phase Two Breaks Ground, More

CAMBA Gardens Phase II, rendering by Dattner Architects

560 Winthrop Street [DNAinfo New York]: Developer CAMBA has broken ground on their nine-story, 293-unit residential building — dubbed CAMBA Gardens Phase II — located at 560 Winthrop Street, in East Flatbush. Completion is expected “in the fall of 2016,” and Dattner Architects is designing.

5-02 54th Avenue [The Real Deal]: Landlord James Juliano has placed the property at 5-02 54th Avenue — in Long Island City, currently the home of a single-story warehouse — on the market for “north of $50 million,” which also includes the smaller site at No. 52-37. The larger site boasts “120,000 square feet of development rights,” and the smaller site 52,000 square feet.

The Beorum, rendering by Flank

The Boerum, rendering by Flank

265 State Street [New York Times]: Dubbed The Boerum, the Carlyle Group is developing a 20-story, 128-unit mixed-use building located at 265 State Street — alternatively 140 Schermerhorn Street, in Downtown Brooklyn — and Flank has released full updated renderings. A “six-story hotel will anchor the tower,” and completion is expected in 2016.

WTC Transit Center [New York Post]: Westfield Corp. “has signed leases with 14 gourmet food stores” to set up shop in the WTC Transit Center, totaling “around 24,000 square feet.” Of the 350,000 square feet Westfield has to manage, Eataly is also to lease 41,000 square feet in 4 World Trade Center.

Building 77, rendering via City of New York

Building 77, rendering via City of New York

Building 77 [Crain's New York]: Building 77, a one-million square-foot manufacturing facility located on 8th Avenue and Paulding Street, in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, has received $140 million in investments from the City for its renovation. Shiel Medical Laboratory is to take 240,000 square feet of the structure, and completion is expected “by mid- to late 2016.”

64 East 1st Street [EV Grieve]: Demolition is complete at 64 East 1st Street, in the East Village, where Ekstein Development has plans for a six-story, six-unit residential building of 13,500 square feet. Excavation is likely imminent, though a completion date has not been announced.

710 3rd Avenue [Commercial Observer]: “An Israeli buyer” has acquired the five-story tenement at 710 3rd Avenue, in Midtown East, for $17.5 million. According to Massey Knakal Realty, “a 25-story, 96-room hotel” has been approved for the site.

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Posted in 140 Schermerhorn Street | 265 State Street | 5-02 54th Avenue | 560 Winthrop Street | 64 East 1st Street | 710 3rd Avenue | Building 77 | WTC Transit Center

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